I once went to get my haircut at an Aveda salon, because my usual girl was booked solid.  Aveda products are some of my favorites so I figured I could rely on the brand.  But when I got there, the Aveda hairdresser looked like she just rolled out bed. Her hair was a complete disaster and she was chomping away on her gum. I hesitated, had her cut my hair anyway, and then begged my usual stylist to fit me in to fix it.   The Aveda hairdresser didn't look the part, and I shouldn't have trusted her.  Thank god I am not a haridresser. On days like today, when the DC humidity is at its most awesome heights, I'm begging my straightener to help save me.  But I am trying to play a part most days. If I am going to give career advice or coach clients on talent or brand Twitter Logomanagement, I better be a ridiculously great walking example, right?  I use Twitter extensively as part of my personal brand.  I had two handles (@DailyCareerTips and @SusanDStrayer). The former was more for business purposes--for career coaching clients, media and discussion and content on job advice, recruiting etc.  The latter was meant more for inside the business--sharing content back and forth with fellow recruiting and career-type peeps, as well as some of my snarky sarcasm.  The only network I kept mostly personal was Facebook.

Well, those days are done. I'm managing one brand, one persona, and one @SusanStrayer.  And that works for me.  If you followed my on @DailyCareerTips, you're now following me automatically @SusanStrayer.  If you followed me @SusanDStrayer, I hope you'll hop on over and minus the D to @SusanStrayer

Many brand experts argue the benefit of separating your profiles, your networks and your commentary.  But I am who I am--and I do censor myself in public on some things (I tend not to curse, talk politics or super-personal issues).  This way I'm not managing several versions of myself. Now, you might find you like the idea of multiple personalities---and being able to be on version of you with one circle, and another with another circle or platform. Totally fine. Just be prepared to manage to that.

But for me, this is what you get. Plus, it's all easier to manage from a logistics perspective. It's like a one-stop Susan Strayer shop. (Except it doesn't sell stuff by the poet Susan Strayer.  That's not me.)

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