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Culture + Talent: Q&A with Cathy Atkins from Metis Communications

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Culture + Talent: Q&A with Cathy Atkins from Metis Communications

We often sit down with leaders of growing businesses to get their take on culture and talent. I recently spoke with Cathy Atkins, co-founder of Metis Communications, a public relations and marketing firm. Cathy has more than 17 years of experience helping companies get in front of the right audiences at the right time. With a mission of “doing our best work ever,” Metis works closely with high-growth, emerging companies that need a true business partner to help them build influence and create measurable results. The “Metis way” is something the company’s team embodies daily, which Cathy hopes will have a long-lasting effect in redrawing the boundaries for PR and marketing.  Here’s what Cathy has to say about culture and talent at Metis.

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: What HR Associates Legally Need to Know

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: What HR Associates Legally Need to Know

Startups and small companies don't always have knowledge of or easy access to all the legal information that falls under Human Resources. Big companies, on the other hand, have dedicated HR professionals or even entire legal departments who specialize in this. Here are some resources about what HR associates legally need to know. 

1) Running Criminal Background Checks? Be Careful, at Least in the Big Apple from The Wall Street Journal

"While criminal background checks are a common part of the hiring process for many companies, there has been legal pushback lately, with federal and state authorities both launching cases against employers they say are using the checks unfairly. How do you define unfair in this context? The thrust of complaints by both the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and New York State has been that blanket rejection of all applicants with a criminal background is not OK — especially if it can be proven that such a practice has a disproportionate impact on black or other minority applicants."

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How to Think Like a Marketer

It all comes down to marketing. When a political candidate is lobbying for votes, he’s campaigning. I would argue he’s marketing. When a lawyer makes it to partner, she’s no longer practicing law, she’s marketing the firm’s services to bring in new business. When a recruiter is seeking out candidates, he’s recruiting. I call that marketing. We could all use a lesson or two in marketing because it applies to a heck of a lot. Most professionals in the HR space are not trained marketers. But so much of what we do involves the core of marketing. Instead, we think marketing is all consumer facing, but it’s just as important to market a company to both candidates and employees (and even alumni!) as it is to consumers.

We’ve talked about the importance of the link between HR and marketing. To help speak the language a little better, here are some tips to help you think like a marketer when marketing your employer brand.

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Ways to Impact How Work Gets Done

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Ways to Impact How Work Gets Done

The book Nudge by Richard H. Thaler, "is about choices—how we make them and how we can make better ones. Drawing on decades of research in the fields of behavioral science and economics... [the authors] show us how sensible “choice architecture” can successfully nudge people toward the best decisions." In the spirit of Nudge, this week's roundup features some ways to impact how work gets done in your office. Think of these ideas as "nudges" to enhance productivity.

1) Even Good Employees Hoard Great Ideas from Harvard Business Review

"One of the most heated debates involving innovation revolves around how to best incentivize people to develop and implement new ideas. Research on this issue offers a wide range of conclusions. For example, one recent research report suggested that offering financial incentives only raised the number of mediocre ideas and had little impact on breakthrough innovation."

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Hiring and Keeping the Best of the Best

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Hiring and Keeping the Best of the Best

We challenge you to attempt three things for your recruiting and retention strategy. First, hire the right employee. Second, hire the best of the best. Third, keep the best of the best. Easy, right? Not quite. These are some of the toughest things startup and growing businesses face. Everyone is looking at hiring and keeping the best of the best. Here is some of the latest thinking around how to do this in this week's weekly roundup.

1) When It Comes to Hiring and Keeping Great Employees, How Do You Stack Up Against the Best? from Inc.

"Consider benchmarking your hiring, salary setting, and mentorship strategies against those of the fastest-growing U.S. companies. Last year, Sam Bacharach, Cornell professor and co-founder of the Bacharach Leadership group, surveyed  more than 300 Inc. 5000 firms to find out how America's fastest-growing companies recruit and develop their best employees. The infographic below displays his results."

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Office Space Design: Q&A with Anne Regan

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Office Space Design: Q&A with Anne Regan

The environment around you can greatly affect your mood and productivity. Think about days when you wake up to gray skies and endless rain. You have zero motivation to get out of bed. By contrast, when you wake up to the sun and 70 degrees, you have all the motivation in the world to get up and get moving. This translates to your work environment as well. You hear about new office spaces – like Facebook or Google – that are designed to motivate a desired behavior (be that creativity, innovation, collaboration, etc.) and reflect a company’s culture and brand. This is what Anne Regan does for a living – she designs office space as a Senior Manager at DBI Architects, which is a DC-based, full-service architecture and interior design firm.

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: A Primer for the Modern Recruiter - Tips to Rethink your Role

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: A Primer for the Modern Recruiter - Tips to Rethink your Role

This week's Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup features a primer for the modern recruiter and includes articles that cover tips to rethink your role as a recruiter. It's easy to fall into a pattern of doing things the way you always have. Face it, today's recruiting challenges are different from yesterday's challenges, and hopefully these tips will highlight some new approaches.

1) 5 Ways To Reinvent Your Recruiting Strategy from Forbes.com

"I’ve seen this happen before: even the very best in-your-face, cult-like workforce culture can’t survive a profits meltdown.  What drew employees to the thriving company – bragging rights, benefits, big salaries and big personalities – will push them away when the shine is off the company, salaries and benefits are frozen, and career advancement is slowed. And forget about trying to fill those empty seats when business picks up – news of a shaky workplace and broken culture travels fast."

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Great Recruiting is Not a Supply Chain

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Great Recruiting is Not a Supply Chain

Most job seekers don't brag about the application process.  They hate it--the black hole of recruiting, the time it takes to hear back from recruiters and the length and complication of the process. But they don't always have insight into recruiters' woes either: heavy requisition loads, corporate processes and rules, and inappropriate candidate behaviors.

Case in point: last week, a recruiting leader posted the following...

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: How to Engage Employees

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: How to Engage Employees

Everyone has heard of the nebulous term "engagement" when it comes to employees. We all know that engagement is relatively low across the board, so now what? You want to jump to action and bring that engagement level up. Below are some articles on how to engage employees and take this vague term and turn it into tangible action. 

1) Recognize, Reward And Engage Your Multi-Generational Workforce from Forbes

"Many leaders and HR pros are struggling to find a way to make multi-generational workforces mesh and be productive. The chatter is all about the changing workforce and managing generational “differences” or as I prefer to say “nuances”...When will we finally be ready to walk the walk (less talk, more action already) about bringing people together?"

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The Gap: Increasing Employee Retention through Increasing Its Minimmum Wage

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The Gap: Increasing Employee Retention through Increasing Its Minimmum Wage

As part of my morning routine, I was sifting through emails on my iPhone today when I came across an email from Gap Inc. with the subject line, “Gap is doing more…” I normally delete these sorts of promotional emails, but this subject line was catchy enough to get me to click through. I assumed it was some sort of corporate social responsibility effort, like reusing waste products from the supply chain or partnering with a non-profit. I was pleasantly surprised to find that it had to do with increasing the minimum hourly rate of their employees to $9 in 2014 and to $10 in 2015. As a customer and former employee of the Gap, I applaud the company, and it’s not necessarily because I feel strongly one way or the other about the minimum wage debate. To catch you up to speed on the minimum wage debate, here are a few quick facts:

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Tips and Must-haves for Developing HR Policies and Writing Policy Manuals

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Tips and Must-haves for Developing HR Policies and Writing Policy Manuals

No matter how small you are, HR Policies and Manuals are an important part of your organization. They reflect your culture and the type of business you want to operate, as well as protect your company should a legal issue occur with an employee. Below are some tips and must-haves for developing HR policies and writing policy manuals. 1) Checklist: Essential Items for Employee Handbook from HR World

"One of the most important features of any successful business is a trusting but professional relationship between the employer and the employed — and one of the best ways to establish this is through employee handbooks. These handbooks set out company policies, procedures and expectations, clearing up confusion and avoiding conflict down the line. Furthermore, they create a structured work environment and help build company loyalty. However, employee handbooks have also been the downfall of many companies. When poorly written, they can do everything from creating a hostile work environment to legally binding an organization to promises it didn't even know it made."

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"And the Winner Is"…One Way to Create Employer Brand Awareness

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"And the Winner Is"…One Way to Create Employer Brand Awareness

Last night millions of Americans tuned into the Oscars to find out who the most talented people are in show business. Why do these awards matter to us so much that we even broke Twitter from excessive retweeting? Awards mean credibility. It’s a way for industries to call out excellence and inform the public of the best of the best. The actors, writers, and directors who were nominated and won last night worked hard to get to that point. The exclusive club of Oscar winners practically guarantees a spot in any movie of the actor's choice. The personal brand recognition of an Oscar winner sky rockets, and the public is now more willing to spend $12 to see his/her movie. The same applies to your employer brand. As a startup or growing company, you are competing with bigger, well-known brands for talent. You are always looking for ways to show credibility early on, and one way (certainly not the only way) could be to stand out through employment-related awards.

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Biggest Recruitment Challenges

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Biggest Recruitment Challenges

Building a candidate pipeline? Recruiting on campus? Or finding someone who is the right fit for expansive growth? These are not easy recruitment tasks. Recruitment can be quite challenging and expensive. Here is a roundup of helpful articles to tackle some of the biggest recruitment challenges. 1) 50 Startup Founders Share Their Biggest Hiring Challenges  from SmartRecruiters

“'In the early, scrappy days of a startup when you have very limited time/resources, you need to strike a great balance between hiring someone for position-need versus hiring someone that’s great regardless of position. If you’re stuck with the position in mind, you may be building a team for near-term need rather than superstar people. But if you’re not practical about growing, you may never get anything done and it’ll never really matter.' -Founder & CEO Daniel Ha, Disqus"

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Best Reads for Recruiters

There's a whole lot of content out there for recruiters. Some good, some not so good. If you're looking for some of the best reads for recruiters, we've sifted through recent content that's out there and highlighted some of our favorites below. And please share anything you have come across in recent months in the comments below. 1) Recruiting: Darwinism or Creationism? from Recruiting Blogs

"Baby I Was Born This Way: Uh, no you weren’t. You were in a really good job that required either A. Good sales and client development skills B. Good research and/or organizational skills, or C. a love for making money.  Nobody grows up wanting to be a recruiter. We happen to luck into to it, and for some of us (the lucky ones?) it becomes the found career path."

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What Happens When Marketing and HR Fall in Love

Brands are valuable. And organizations spend nearly half a trillion dollars every year to introduce, promote and manage their brands. In 2012, Procter & Gamble spent over $4.8 billion on advertising. Selling is an expensive proposition. But it doesn’t have to be. Brands are finally starting to reap the value of social media and, as the 2013 Super Bowl proved, the brand value of one tweet can exceed the $3.5 million per-commercial ad spend.

Traditional advertising isn’t dead, but brands continue to look for ways to save money and use existing assets creatively.

Enter the workforce.  Talent and HR leaders know the value of an employer brand—essentially the reputation of your brand as a place to work. But in my previous role leading the employer brand function for Marriott International, I had to do much more that that. Branding the workforce is telling a great story and getting future employees to want to be a part of the tale.

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Forget Super Bowl Sunday: Five Reasons Competition Is Good For Workplace Culture

While this year's Super Bowl ads are leaning toward thecuteness factor, the game is all about the competition. Fromsports talk radio to trash talking reporters, winning predictions, potential stars and placing betsdrive our obsession with the game. Scores, statistics, pre-game tape reviews: teams strategize how to win and rally the fans behind them. And it works. One Seahawks fan is so confident in his team, he already has a tattoo declaring Seattle as Super Bowl champions. But come Monday morning, we're back to work. Which makes me wonder: where's this kind of loyalty in the workplace? Across 2012, much of exaqueo's workforce research showed a preference for paychecks over promotions. Has the fire in the belly gone out for most workers? Have we lost the passion that drives us to do the best we can in our jobs, rally behind our company missions and strive towards greater success? Maybe tattoos aren't the answer to employee engagement, but somewhere along the climb out of the recession, employees have become complacent--perhaps understandably so. 

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: What Makes the Best Boss

Bosses get a bad rap. Let's face it, they're in tough spots - managing upwards, downwards, sideways, crossways. Needless to say, they juggle a lot. We’ve all had experiences with both bad and good bosses - those who could care less what you did on the weekend, and those who go the extra mile to advocate for you during performance reviews. You need to have enough of them in order to recognize those qualities that make a boss great because sometimes we don’t realize we have a good boss until we have a really bad one. This week’s weekly round-up includes insights into what makes the best boss, so pay close attention all you current and future bosses!

1) Why Gay Men Make the Best Bosses from Details.com

"...during Snyder’s five-year study of American executives, he stumbled on some startling findings: Gay male bosses produce 35 to 60 percent higher levels of employee engagement, satisfaction, and morale than straight bosses. This is no small achievement: According to human-resources consulting firm Towers Perrin, only a measly 14 percent of the global corporate workforce are fully engaged by their jobs. And the Saratoga Institute, a group that measures the effectiveness of HR departments, found that in a study of 20,000 workers who had quit their jobs, the primary motivator for jumping ship was their supervisors’ behavior."

2) Top 10 Traits of an Exceptional Boss from Huffington Post

"They’re effective, not productive. We live and work in a fast-paced, ever-changing, highly competitive world. Maybe there was a time when process and productivity ruled, but these days, management needs to be flexible and adaptive. Sure, you’ve got to prioritize, but once you figure out what needs to be done, it’s generally more important to be effective than to squeeze every last iota of productivity out of yourself and your people."

3) On Leadership: Things a Great Boss Never Does from PR News

"A great boss never…assumes he or she is the smartest person in the room. - Nikki Bracy, public relations account executive at Vitamin. Organizations are full of creative and talented people, and all of the smarts are not reserved for the corner office. Good bosses need confidence in their own intelligence, but they should also have an open disposition and seek input from all levels of the company."

4) Best of the Rest: Articles for Your Boss from The WorkBuzz (powered by CareerBuilder)

"Fear doesn’t really work as a motivational technique – and it takes on a life of its own in an organization. “Some leaders believe that a little fear actually keeps everyone on their toes,” says Laurie K. Cure of Innovative Connections, Inc., a consulting company that focuses on organizational effectiveness. “I maintain the belief that creating safe, open work environments is a better way to ensure innovation, creativity and productivity.” Why Fear Doesn’t Create Accountability via Intuit. Lesson: Fear can be stifling. Transparency and respect are more powerful leadership tools."

Be tough on problems, not on the people helping you solve them. Yes, you’ll have to make some difficult decisions but this doesn’t mean you should be difficult to deal with. Inspire your team – don’t terrify them. “This is being ‘soft.’ The tone you set will reverberate through the culture of your organization.”A crash course in leadership… via Fast Company. Lesson: Working side-by-side with people to solve problems will work. Raising your voice and losing your cool won’t really help."

Lexi Gordon is a Lead Consultant for exaqueo, a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact exaqueo to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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How Recruiting Can Manage Change And Be A Partner

Many people will insist that the most important part of having a corporate recruiting team is to have a clearly defined structure, utilize metrics to drive business decisions, and to gather as much buy-in as possible throughout the organization to move initiatives forward. Most of that is absolutely correct. But what about when all of your best laid plans start to.....change? While having the clearly defined structure is important, it’s key to remember to be flexible and open to integrating change on an ad hoc basis. It’s critical to ensure that your teams are flexible with your recruiting programs, SOPs and approach to projects. There will be almost certainly be situations where you may need to change based on unexpected situations or business needs. 

For example, within your recruiting team there may be a certain process or chain for approving requisitions or offers. But department heads or other executives may determine that a different course of action may be required based on headcount needs. The process-driven recruiter in you wants to continue to instill process and order, but that just may not be feasible at the current moment.

Having a level of flexibility in situations like these actually helps you more than you might think. Executive teams recognize when they have team players who can be highly adaptable, and perceive them as strong business partners. Being viewed in such a way can be critical when you are trying to "sell" your department's initiatives. What I’ve learned over the years - sometimes the hard way - is that you just need to “play ball” sometimes and see how things turn out.

There are a few things to keep in mind the next time you encounter a situation where your recruitment team is having some change thrust upon it.

1. Keeping good metrics can help to draw tangible conclusions as to whether an experiment or pilot actually worked. It can also help to identify where the most/least successful areas are for making changes. As one of my former bosses told me “facts are our friends”. Feelings are not. People tend to ‘feel’ a lot of things in the hiring process : “it feels like this req has been open for 4 months” (and its been 17 days). This is the opportunity to influence change through facts.

2. Ask questions. Be sure to ask probing and clarifying questions when changes to your program are being suggested. This allows you to accomplish two things. First, it allows you to understand what the motives are behind the change, which could lead to additional solutions or parts of the solution. Secondly, it shows the other party that you are genuinely interested in how you can assist.

3. Remember that exhibiting flexibility puts you in a good light with your peers and executives. Executives tend to gravitate to those that they feel can be open-minded and those that they perceive are able to see the ‘big picture’.

4. Manage the change down. When working with your recruiting teams – if you want real buy-in – be sure to give them both the political side of the change and the action that needs to be taken in order to be successful. Challenge them to stretch themselves beyond their comfort zone and you may be surprised how many people embrace the change. Be approachable and willing resource who can answer questions throughout the change process.

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Pete Radloff is a Lead Consultant with exaqueo. You can connect with Pete on Twitter.  exaqueo is a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

 

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What Company Cultures Can Learn From Freemasons

Harry Houdini. Henry Ford. John Wayne. Winston Churchill. My grandpa. What's the common bond? They were all Freemasons. From fraternities and Freemasons to the Girl Scouts or Rotary, membership really does have its privileges: belonging. We join groups, teams, clubs and even companies to feel a part of something. A community or camaraderie. That's what culture really is: specific rules and attributes that define who you are and how things work. The rules of the road, the community norms. The way we exist. It's what makes strong cultures strong.

The Freemasons began as a guild in the 1700s for stonemasons and then evolved to a social organization full of ritual and rites of belonging. Historically, the rituals drove conspiracies which in turn drove attention and ultimately membership. At its height in 1939, the Freemasons had 4 million members. 

Today, still boasting a membership of over one million members, the Freemasons continue to welcome new recruits into their culture. They don't actively solicit new members--you'll need a referral--and you'll have to check off a few boxes:  men only, above 18, good character and belief in a supreme being (it doesn't matter which one but no atheists allowed).  And that's about all I know for sure because the rest is a secret.

There's a reason ritual, secrecy and tradition matter here. It's called culture. And if your organization wants a strong one, you're better off to learn from an organization that's been in existence for 800 years over hot brands with track records of less than a few decades. Here are six ways you can strengthen your culture Freemason-style:

1) Get people interested in your culture and keep them interested.

While membership in the Freemasons has ebbed and flowed over the years, they've found a way to stay relevant. For modern men, the Dan Brown books did the trick. For modern organizations, they have to stay vocal and relevant to drive interest. That means regular content, and insight where possible into what makes you special and unique.

2) Be clear about what it takes.

While most companies wax poetic about the incredible career opportunities or company culture, they avoid being upfront about how they recruit and who they recruit. Freemasons are clear on qualifications, how to recruit, and who to talk to about membership. Direct connection with a member gives you an immediate, personal, offline culture connection.

3) Show a commitment to your community.

When you create a culture you have to demonstrate no matter how elite or special it is, you care about the larger world that allows your culture to exist. You can't shut yourself off. Freemasons donate an average of $2 million to charity. Every day.

4) Make it special.

Freemasons have secrets.They have closed meetings. Not anyone can become a member. And when you do, you have to keep what's secret, secret.  There's something special that provides a certain allure. And when you're in, it's that sense of belonging.  Same thing goes for organizations with strong cultures. They care about how they welcome you and give you benefits only members have. That gold mason's ring that belonged to my grandpa? My dad had it melted down since he couldn't wear it.

5) Make it accessible.

Great cultures aren't elitist. Freemasons come in all colors and creeds. And they ban conversations on divisive topics like religion and politics. It's not about being better than someone or something else. It's about being a part of something bigger. Accessible, but you have to really want it and make the effort. Organizations with great cultures don't give job offers after one paltry interview. Both sides need to truly flesh out fit.

6) Be consistent.

Every company has a vague list of values on the wall. How many can say they have practiced those same values and have rites of tradition lasting 800+ years? You may not want to develop extensive ritualistic practices but you can develop work rules to show how your culture manifests itself in the business.  Align traditions for work and play -- and don't abandon them. Make cultural norms crystal clear and long-lasting.

Like any culture, the Freemasons have rabid fans and detractors.  And for most modern-day companies, look no further than Glassdoor to find the same.  This isn't an endorsement or a criticism--we can learn similar lessons from many long-lasting religious groups, political parties and local clubs.  It's about understanding what drives long-lasting culture, that sustains and aligns.

Find what defines your organization--what you live by, how you exist, and the constancy that will ensure your business is around in 2714. Then live it, practice it, and hire to it. Don't you want to leave job opportunities for your great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandchildren?

Susan LaMotte is the founder of exaqueo, a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact exaqueo to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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HR and Talent Weekly Roundup: Jumpstart Your Culture

exaqueocorevaluesAnother year, a fresh perspective, a renewed chance to think about the role people play in your organization. If you're thinking about rebooting your culture in 2014, stop and pay attention to the pieces we've found this week to help jumpstart that process.

Remember, culture isn't just a list of values on a wall.  I heard from one company on this very snowy day with safety as a core value. Leadership never bothered to communicate to employees on whether offices were open or reminded them to be safe. Huh.

If you want a perspective on how to better your culture, let us know. We offer startup culture audits for clients ($1200.00) and full-scale culture analyses for high-growth companies.

Our first story this week? A video interview...

1) Medallia’s Amy Pressman On Onboarding To Create Corporate Culture from Tech Crunch

"We hire really smart people and really driven people but we want them to realize their full potential and deliver that in performance cand one of the things we want them to do is get comfortable learning all the time taking smart risks and being relaly willing to hold up a mirror when something doesn't go well and being able to say this is what I learned from it. We do a wee

2)  10 Things You'll Want To Remember In 2014 from OPEN Forum

"In the midst of the huge news stories that affected small business owners in 2013, OPEN Forum ran a number of articles that resonated with our readers, whether it was to their desire to be more productive or to be better employers. With all the think pieces and year in reviews rolling out as 2013 comes to a close, it's easy to forget some of the things we've read these last 12 months."

3) How to Engender a Performance Culture from CFO.com

"New Year’s resolutions aren’t just for people trying to drop a few pounds or organize their closets. With 2014 fast approaching, corporations, too, are thinking about what they might do differently in the year ahead.  The Katzenbach Center [found] a stunning 60 percent of survey respondents say culture is even more important to business success than a company’s strategy or operating model."

4)  How Startup Founders Set the Right Company Culture from AlleyWatch.com

"Great cultures don’t just happen. If it’s your startup, you have to make it happen, and it’s worth the effort to start on that first. I assure you that it’s easier to set it right at the start than it is to change it later. Key elements of building the right culture include a written and communicated business plan, defining and practicing company values and measuring your progress."

Susan LaMotte is the founder of exaqueo, a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact exaqueo to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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