Human Resources Today

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high-growth

Culture + Talent: Q&A with Cathy Atkins from Metis Communications

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Culture + Talent: Q&A with Cathy Atkins from Metis Communications

We often sit down with leaders of growing businesses to get their take on culture and talent. I recently spoke with Cathy Atkins, co-founder of Metis Communications, a public relations and marketing firm. Cathy has more than 17 years of experience helping companies get in front of the right audiences at the right time. With a mission of “doing our best work ever,” Metis works closely with high-growth, emerging companies that need a true business partner to help them build influence and create measurable results. The “Metis way” is something the company’s team embodies daily, which Cathy hopes will have a long-lasting effect in redrawing the boundaries for PR and marketing.  Here’s what Cathy has to say about culture and talent at Metis.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Supporting Your Employees Edition

Last week we talked about the oft-overlooked yet major necessity in startup and high-growth companies: employee feedback. This week, we're taking that a step further. Feedback is just the baseline requirement with your employees. You also owe them some support, coaching and development along the way.  That's not to say they shouldn't take ownership of their own careers and development. They should. But you need to show them how.  Supporting your employees is part of your job even if your company is three people. This week we've rounded up some advice for you as managers and some links to pass along to your team. Feedback is the beginning, follow-through, learning, growth and development is another.

For your team:

1) Four Ways to Advance Your Career at a Startup at The Daily Muse

"At a start-up, there’s always way more to do than people to get it done. So, think about the types of people your company would hire if the company was twice the size, choose an area that you’d like to learn about, and suggest a project to the founders. For example, if your company has talked about building out a sales team in the future and you’d love to get exposure in that area, offer to test out the viability of sales as a customer acquisition strategy. As long as you’re still performing in your core role, your manager will probably be happy to have the extra help—and you’ll have the chance to build out a new skill set."

2) Why Your Boss Still Hasn't Promoted You at The Fast Track

"Do you take feedback well, or get huffy and pout or gripe about any criticism? You’ve got to develop thicker skin the higher you go on the career ladder, so an inability to accept feedback professionally could be sending the message you’re immature and not ready to play with the big kids."

For you:

3) Managing with Empathy at Medium

"As you might imagine, the work days at Obama for America (the president’s 2012 reëlection campaign) were long, with good reason. But it takes its toll on people over time. My colleague Lauren Peterson came up with the idea of guaranteeing folks two nights each week that, no matter what, they’d be out the door by 8 p.m. We quickly adopted this on my team and referred to it as “time to do human things”. A few people asked me if they could come in at noon instead. That let them pay bills, buy groceries or just get some much needed sleep. The “in by noon” option quickly became the more popular choice."

4) How to Write a Love Letter to Your Future Startup Employee at Tech Cocktail

"... explain how you will show employees how your startup values their talent, work ethic, and dedication. Consider the following questions for inspiration writing this section: What about the employee’s work ethic do you appreciate? Why do you value your talents? These questions will help you explain to your future employee why they will be an asset to the company and how you will reward them for their hard work and dedication."

 

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exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Supporting Your Employees Edition

Last week we talked about the oft-overlooked yet major necessity in startup and high-growth companies: employee feedback. This week, we're taking that a step further. Feedback is just the baseline requirement with your employees. You also owe them some support, coaching and development along the way.  That's not to say they shouldn't take ownership of their own careers and development. They should. But you need to show them how.  Supporting your employees is part of your job even if your company is three people. This week we've rounded up some advice for you as managers and some links to pass along to your team. Feedback is the beginning, follow-through, learning, growth and development is another.

For your team:

1) Four Ways to Advance Your Career at a Startup at The Daily Muse

"At a start-up, there’s always way more to do than people to get it done. So, think about the types of people your company would hire if the company was twice the size, choose an area that you’d like to learn about, and suggest a project to the founders. For example, if your company has talked about building out a sales team in the future and you’d love to get exposure in that area, offer to test out the viability of sales as a customer acquisition strategy. As long as you’re still performing in your core role, your manager will probably be happy to have the extra help—and you’ll have the chance to build out a new skill set."

2) Why Your Boss Still Hasn't Promoted You at The Fast Track

"Do you take feedback well, or get huffy and pout or gripe about any criticism? You’ve got to develop thicker skin the higher you go on the career ladder, so an inability to accept feedback professionally could be sending the message you’re immature and not ready to play with the big kids."

For you:

3) Managing with Empathy at Medium

"As you might imagine, the work days at Obama for America (the president’s 2012 reëlection campaign) were long, with good reason. But it takes its toll on people over time. My colleague Lauren Peterson came up with the idea of guaranteeing folks two nights each week that, no matter what, they’d be out the door by 8 p.m. We quickly adopted this on my team and referred to it as “time to do human things”. A few people asked me if they could come in at noon instead. That let them pay bills, buy groceries or just get some much needed sleep. The “in by noon” option quickly became the more popular choice."

4) How to Write a Love Letter to Your Future Startup Employee at Tech Cocktail

"... explain how you will show employees how your startup values their talent, work ethic, and dedication. Consider the following questions for inspiration writing this section: What about the employee’s work ethic do you appreciate? Why do you value your talents? These questions will help you explain to your future employee why they will be an asset to the company and how you will reward them for their hard work and dedication."

 

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exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Supporting Your Employees Edition

Last week we talked about the oft-overlooked yet major necessity in startup and high-growth companies: employee feedback. This week, we're taking that a step further. Feedback is just the baseline requirement with your employees. You also owe them some support, coaching and development along the way.  That's not to say they shouldn't take ownership of their own careers and development. They should. But you need to show them how.  Supporting your employees is part of your job even if your company is three people. This week we've rounded up some advice for you as managers and some links to pass along to your team. Feedback is the beginning, follow-through, learning, growth and development is another.

For your team:

1) Four Ways to Advance Your Career at a Startup at The Daily Muse

"At a start-up, there’s always way more to do than people to get it done. So, think about the types of people your company would hire if the company was twice the size, choose an area that you’d like to learn about, and suggest a project to the founders. For example, if your company has talked about building out a sales team in the future and you’d love to get exposure in that area, offer to test out the viability of sales as a customer acquisition strategy. As long as you’re still performing in your core role, your manager will probably be happy to have the extra help—and you’ll have the chance to build out a new skill set."

2) Why Your Boss Still Hasn't Promoted You at The Fast Track

"Do you take feedback well, or get huffy and pout or gripe about any criticism? You’ve got to develop thicker skin the higher you go on the career ladder, so an inability to accept feedback professionally could be sending the message you’re immature and not ready to play with the big kids."

For you:

3) Managing with Empathy at Medium

"As you might imagine, the work days at Obama for America (the president’s 2012 reëlection campaign) were long, with good reason. But it takes its toll on people over time. My colleague Lauren Peterson came up with the idea of guaranteeing folks two nights each week that, no matter what, they’d be out the door by 8 p.m. We quickly adopted this on my team and referred to it as “time to do human things”. A few people asked me if they could come in at noon instead. That let them pay bills, buy groceries or just get some much needed sleep. The “in by noon” option quickly became the more popular choice."

4) How to Write a Love Letter to Your Future Startup Employee at Tech Cocktail

"... explain how you will show employees how your startup values their talent, work ethic, and dedication. Consider the following questions for inspiration writing this section: What about the employee’s work ethic do you appreciate? Why do you value your talents? These questions will help you explain to your future employee why they will be an asset to the company and how you will reward them for their hard work and dedication."

 

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exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Work Rules: What They Are and Why You Need Them

Work Rules: What They Are and Why You Need ThemEvery company wants to be cool in some way -- more specifically, be known for something: a great place to work, a cool thing to be part of, a place people brag about joining. That's where the values come in. Whether valuable or not (pun intended), core values are the hot topic when it comes to culture. You have to have them. And whether you're Toms Shoes, Whole Foods or Teach for America, your values set the stage for your business.

While values and culture creation is the first step, it's not the most important. Enter work rules.

What Are Work Rules?

"Work rules" is a term we've developed here at exaqueo. Work rules are a way to make what a company values real and hold employees accountable. You can have the best list of core values ever, but if you don't hold employees accountable and align the way you do business to them, they don't mean anything.

Here's how it works:

Take one of Whole Foods' core values: "supporting team member excellence and happiness." Sounds good, right? But what exactly does that mean? How is that manifested in the day to day operations of a Whole Foods store?

It could mean personal support -- doing right by each other when it comes to learning and development, lots of time off, special dispensation for family needs, stipends for personal interests. Or, it could be about the business -- supporting team members who need help stocking shelves or find themselves overwhelmed with a line of customers at customer service.

You Have to Define Your Values

Specifically, what do they look like in practice? And at Whole Foods, this particular value is focused more on workplace happiness than happiness outside of work.

Nothing wrong with that -- in fact, their clarity is commendable. As an current or future employee it's clear what they mean by happiness. I can expect very fair wages. I shouldn't expect extra time off.

Another example of a value many companies might have is "customer service." But what kind of customer service is valued?

That's where work rules come in.  Maybe the focus is on deep customer relationships and problem solving. Or it could be about fast service, getting customers served efficiently and correctly. Either way, work rules help you better define what great performance looks like in your organization, and that makes hiring and performance management better. And it helps your company stay focused.

If you're wondering if it's worth it, if there's real, monetary value in this, let me know. I'll send you a real-world example from one of our clients.

If you need the motivation to get started, ask yourself how important talent is to growth.

There's your answer.

exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Technology and Tools Edition

Talent and HR News Roundup: Technology and Tools EditionWhen you make strategic recommendations for a living, it goes without saying that you have to know your technology and tools. The organizations relying on exaqueo for broad guidance also need help with execution. And that often means bringing in help in the form of technology and tools. What we're seeing in the market lately is a real trend in personalization -- HR and talent technologies that help startup and high-growth companies start to execute on HR and not just play pretend. This week, we've gathered a few sources to help pique your interest. And when you need our help, just shout.

1) What IT Recruiters Know About You at CIO:

"RemarkableHire uses what it calls 'social evidence' that people are knowledgeable in a particular skill by looking, among other things, for recognition by their peers and indications that they've provided the best answers to questions posted online. 'We look for signals within the content that someone has expertise in a particular skill,' says Rothrock. The company then provides skills proficiency ratings of one to four stars for each subject."

2) The Candidate Experience: The ROI of a Powerful Movement in Talent Acquisition at the Human Capital Institute:

"TalentCircles has been designed with the candidate experience in mind -- it's a people-centric engagement tool that empowers the recruiter to deliver on candidates’ expectations.  Our holistic approach, a talent engagement platform, optimizes both the candidate’s and the recruiter’s experience."

3) What We're Up To: Bios And Jobs at Kin:

"Everyone has a story, and Kin’s bio pages gives your team a way to share theirs. Employees can provide their story, social networks, and personal links, and Kin will do the rest by providing contact information and a link to that team member’s job description. What’s nice is a user can quickly navigate through the entire company using the simple and quick navigation at the top of the page."

4) Social Performance Management: A Webinar from Teamly and Tibbr:

"Regular checkins between managers and their direct reports are a great way to provide continuous feedback, and means there won’t be any surprise when it comes time to do the annual review. But most companies don’t operate this way, preferring to leave everything to the end of the year and do a 'thorough' review instead."

exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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