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perks

Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Perks, Benefits, and Work Style

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Perks, Benefits, and Work Style

The race for talent is on. Companies are offering many different perks and benefits to stand out from the crowd. But are these what candidates and employees really value? Or just putting lipstick on a pig? In this week's Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup, we're sharing some of the latest thinking around perks, benefits, and work style. 

1) Wedding expenses and Tesla leases: The arms race in employee perks from Washington Post

"Nick DeMarco runs a small biotech startup in Raleigh, N.C., that makes scientific instruments. But what got his company, Practichem, attention from CNBC's "Power Lunch," the Huffington Post, Fortune and other media outlets last week wasn't the innovative products he's making. It was his promise to lease Tesla Model 3s to employees when they become available. "The world’s changed a lot, and technology people are really hard to bring in," DeMarco, who has 10 full-time employees and is trying to double that number with new hires, said in an interview Monday. He believes spending money to lease the wildly popular cars -- which are not expected to be available until at least the end of next year -- will turn out to be a smarter recruiting investment than funneling more money to headhunters. Though he sees the leases as rewards for good performance to help retain current workers, he's also hopeful the media coverage and word-of-mouth from employees will help him hire people with the skills he needs in what he calls an "esoteric field." "We're not sexy," he says."

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Telecommuting: Something even the Pope can get behind!

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Telecommuting: Something even the Pope can get behind!

Pope’s first stop on his US tour. As of a few weeks ago, there was a ton of coverage on how his visit will impact the area and our commutes. One headline read, “Seriously, You Should Not Drive When the Pope Is Here.” Our city shuts down at the sight of one snowflake, so you can imagine the frenzy this has created in terms of being on the roads. Not to mention, we are ranked as having the WORST traffic in the country. While the Pope visiting our nation’s capital is an attraction for many, it doesn’t mean that the daily lives of residents come to a hault. Many companies opted to allow their employees to work from home during the visit to avoid unnecessary traffic. I work from home most days as we are a remote company, and I’ve worked in the consulting industry long enough, so this is nothing new to me. However, in talking to friends who do work in an office every day, most complained about how their companies dragged their feet in letting them work from home.

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Talent and HR News Weekly Update: Making Sure Employees Are Happy

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Talent and HR News Weekly Update: Making Sure Employees Are Happy

Earlier this week, we shared an interview with Lily Cua from Aspire about providing employees meaningful company perks. This is all part of a larger effort to improve the work experience, and thus hopefully give employees the warm and fuzzy feeling that makes them want to stick around (there's more to employee retention, but this is part of it).  To continue along with this theme, this week's Talent and HR News Weekly Update features some recent news pieces focused on making sure employees are happy (you may have seen one about a few (very) big tech firms providing a certain benefit to boost female retention...) Enjoy!

1) Kip Tindell: How He Created An Employee-First Culture At The Container Store from Forbes

"I spoke to Kip Tindell, who is currently the Chairman & CEO of The Container Store. He was presented with Ernst & Young’s prestigious Entrepreneur of the Year award in 1991 and is a recipient of the National Retail Federation’s 1998 Innovator of the Year Award. In 2006, along with wife Sharon Tindell (Chief Merchandising Officer) and Garrett Boone (Chairman Emeritus), Tindell was inducted into the Retailing Hall of Fame and he is a 2009 Junior Achievement of Dallas Business Hall of Fame inductee."

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Four Reasons Perks Won't Help Your Culture or Hiring

4 Reasons Perks Won't WorkToo often I hear company leaders or recruiters say things like: "Our culture is great. We have free lunches, you can bring your dog to work, and there's free beer every day at 5pm." Workplace culture does not equal perks.

Perks aren't culture. Even ridiculous perks.  Culture is culture.

Culture is the way in which you work--the norms and values that define who you are as a business and what makes you different. It's how you get work done and the way people are expected to behave.  Culture is your foundation and then your build your business around it--including perks.

Here are four reasons you shouldn't confuse perks and culture:

1) Perks Are False Promises

If you just focus on perks, it's like promising a gorgeous engagement ring--without meeting the guy. If the guy sucks, the ring is only sparkly for so long. Then you get tired of it. No one stays at a company for the perks. They stay for their boss, the product, the potential, the work. Why waste time luring people in only to lose them after the fourth date (week)?

2) Perks Can Blow Up In Your Face

Sure, dogs in the office are cool. But what if that new developer you're trying desperately to hire is allergic? Think about the ridiculousness of that conversation: "We'd love to give you an offer, but we typically have dogs in the office so this isn't going to work." Really? You'll give up a great candidate for that?

3) You Don't Want a Candidate to Make a Decision Based on Perks

When you get that fantastic candidate to fill the void on your sales team, do you really want him to take the offer based on free beer? No. You want him to be passionate about what he's selling, the team behind the product or service and the future of the business.

4) Perks Don't Make Your Employees Perform Better

Free drycleaning or a easy-access gym might make employees' lives easier, but it won't turn an average developer into a stellar one. Culture, values and work rules are much better at vetting out candidates who won't perform well in your environment. For example, one candidate might be a Ruby rockstar but she can't get used to your super-fast product development cycles or deal with the complete transparency that's part of the way you do business

Should you ignore perks? No--they're important rewards and incentives to your business. Just don't hang your culture and hiring hat on them. Otherwise you build a company based on fringe benefits instead of on values.

And when you create perks for your business, tie them to your culture first. If one of your core values is customer service, perks should be designed to make it easier to service customers (making it quieter, freeing up your time, or giving you a budget to spend to develop relationships with customers).

Don't want to give up on perks? Don't. Just make sure your culture, values and work rules are strong. And sell those first.

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exaqueo is a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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