Human Resources Today

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recruiting

Moments That Matter in the Candidate Experience

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Moments That Matter in the Candidate Experience

Recruiting has fundamentally changed with the rise of the social web and technology. Candidates expect to easily access information about your company through a variety of resources, as well as more personalized communication, interaction and transparency. Candidates scrutinize your company in new ways and make more informed decisions than ever before.

This means you must work smarter to meet your candidates’ needs without knowing when they’re ready to make a decision or influence someone else’s. Today, it’s more important than ever to build a strong employer brand and provide a positive experience for candidates to compete for top talent.  And that means you have to be just as detail-oriented and scrutinize every element of the employment experience. Just like a candidate.

In comes the moment of truth …

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Talent and HR News Weekly Update: Recruiting and Retention

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Talent and HR News Weekly Update: Recruiting and Retention

When expertly executed, an effective employer brand strategy can make a positive impact on talent attraction, as well as talent retention. Here are five articles curated to help you recruit and retain best-fit talent. Enjoy!
 

1) How to Reinvent Retention Strategies That Work from Business 2 Community

Retention strategies for talent should be every company’s priority. It’s something that simply cannot slip past your radar. Competition is stiff, the market is actively looking for talented individuals and you have some of them. You have to be on your guard otherwise you’ll quickly watch your top resources slip away leaving behind a huge void in your talent pool.

There are several strategies companies have employed to encourage retention. Some of them include bonus plans, reward programs, training and so on. But if you’re working with a tight budget and still want to hold on to your top talent try these retention strategies.

Read the full weekly update.

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Talent and HR News Weekly Update: Hiring and Training Trends

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Talent and HR News Weekly Update: Hiring and Training Trends

It's the fourth quarter and many human resource professionals are deep into strategic planning for the upcoming year. This week's Talent and HR News Weekly Update includes insight to help you plan for your organization's future. Enjoy! 

New Report Reveals the Trends That Will Define Recruiting in 2017 from LinkedIn

It’s not too early to start for planning for 2017. The best way to do that is to look at this current year, assess how you stack against your peers and think about the trends that will shape your work over the next year. To help with that, LinkedIn just released its annual Global Recruiting Trends 2017 report.

The report is based on a survey of around 4,000 corporate talent acquisition leaders across 35 countries and it will give you a look into how recruiting leaders perceive the importance of their teams, the top metrics and priorities they track, as well as how they spend their budgets and where they’d like to invest.

Read the full weekly update

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It’s OK Not To Be A “Technical” Recruiter

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It’s OK Not To Be A “Technical” Recruiter

There is a pervasive thought among technical candidates these days that the recruiters who are contacting them for opportunities haven't got a clue as to what they are doing. And, by and large, they are absolutely correct. After all, we're recruiters, and we're in a profession that has little to no barrier to entry. 

While it's been proven that with the right amount of (correct) training, strong recruiters can be built in the model of nurture over nature, it doesn't happen by osmosis. So what can we do in order to help prepare ourselves better to speak with technical candidates? Because doing so will not only help us recruit better and build a stronger rapport with candidates, but will indirectly have a positive impact on your company's recruiting brand. 

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Innovative Hiring

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Innovative Hiring

In this week's Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup, we're featuring a mix of insight on innovative hiring. Enjoy!

1) A Data-Driven Approach to Group Creativity from Harvard Business Review

“How can you ensure that your company has innovative teams? Though many organizations already use assessment for hiring, leadership development, team-building, and executive coaching, it has not been extended much to hiring and building better innovation teams. Why does this even matter? It matters because innovation requires specific personality types, characteristics, and an environment that engenders psychological safety, to be unleashed. In select studies, innovation teams that leveraged personality types generated 95 times more profit and increased the speed as well as effectiveness of new business development by over 900% compared to their counterparts.”

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Talent and HR News Weekly Update: Getting - and Keeping - the Right Employees

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Talent and HR News Weekly Update: Getting - and Keeping - the Right Employees

Attracting new employees is hard enough. It's a huge investment, and you could spend months or even years trying to find that diamond in the rough. Now that you found that diamond, it doesn't end there. Retaining the right employees is a whole other beast. This week's Talent and HR News Weekly update features the latest thinking around getting - and keeping - the right employees. 

1) So You've Hired Someone Great--Now What? from Inc.

"Over a recent breakfast meeting, a colleague, Marisa, was discussing her company's challenges in integrating newly hired people into their culture. She went on to describe candidates who aced every round of interviews and had buy-in from all levels of the company. In her opinion, such high-performers should successfully and seamlessly integrate into the organization's culture without assistance. She was perplexed why some of her new hires hadn't lived up to her expectations--failing to assimilate or just not turning out to be the motivated personalities she saw in the interviews."

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Careers Sites

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Careers Sites

In honor of launching our new website this week (if you haven't already, poke around and tell us what you think!), we thought it would be appropriate to focus this roundup on the part of the web most relevant to talent and HR: careers sites.  This week the roundup features the latest in career site updates and announcements from companies across the country.

1) With New Website, Pep Boys Wants to Attract People Who ‘Put Customers First’ from ERE

"Pep Boys has sent a new career site live, one aimed at attracting people with a customer-service mentality. Pep Boys, which operates in 35 states in the U.S. as well as in Puerto Rico, wants to be known for having great customer service. That effort has been a couple of years in the making." 

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How to Think Like a Marketer

It all comes down to marketing. When a political candidate is lobbying for votes, he’s campaigning. I would argue he’s marketing. When a lawyer makes it to partner, she’s no longer practicing law, she’s marketing the firm’s services to bring in new business. When a recruiter is seeking out candidates, he’s recruiting. I call that marketing. We could all use a lesson or two in marketing because it applies to a heck of a lot. Most professionals in the HR space are not trained marketers. But so much of what we do involves the core of marketing. Instead, we think marketing is all consumer facing, but it’s just as important to market a company to both candidates and employees (and even alumni!) as it is to consumers.

We’ve talked about the importance of the link between HR and marketing. To help speak the language a little better, here are some tips to help you think like a marketer when marketing your employer brand.

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: A Primer for the Modern Recruiter - Tips to Rethink your Role

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: A Primer for the Modern Recruiter - Tips to Rethink your Role

This week's Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup features a primer for the modern recruiter and includes articles that cover tips to rethink your role as a recruiter. It's easy to fall into a pattern of doing things the way you always have. Face it, today's recruiting challenges are different from yesterday's challenges, and hopefully these tips will highlight some new approaches.

1) 5 Ways To Reinvent Your Recruiting Strategy from Forbes.com

"I’ve seen this happen before: even the very best in-your-face, cult-like workforce culture can’t survive a profits meltdown.  What drew employees to the thriving company – bragging rights, benefits, big salaries and big personalities – will push them away when the shine is off the company, salaries and benefits are frozen, and career advancement is slowed. And forget about trying to fill those empty seats when business picks up – news of a shaky workplace and broken culture travels fast."

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Great Recruiting is Not a Supply Chain

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Great Recruiting is Not a Supply Chain

Most job seekers don't brag about the application process.  They hate it--the black hole of recruiting, the time it takes to hear back from recruiters and the length and complication of the process. But they don't always have insight into recruiters' woes either: heavy requisition loads, corporate processes and rules, and inappropriate candidate behaviors.

Case in point: last week, a recruiting leader posted the following...

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Best Reads for Recruiters

There's a whole lot of content out there for recruiters. Some good, some not so good. If you're looking for some of the best reads for recruiters, we've sifted through recent content that's out there and highlighted some of our favorites below. And please share anything you have come across in recent months in the comments below. 1) Recruiting: Darwinism or Creationism? from Recruiting Blogs

"Baby I Was Born This Way: Uh, no you weren’t. You were in a really good job that required either A. Good sales and client development skills B. Good research and/or organizational skills, or C. a love for making money.  Nobody grows up wanting to be a recruiter. We happen to luck into to it, and for some of us (the lucky ones?) it becomes the found career path."

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Best Practices in Veteran Recruiting

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: Best Practices in Veteran Recruiting

Serving in the military is incredibly honorable. Service members learn so many useful skills and have the ability to perform well under intense pressure. Transitioning to civilian life can be an adjustment though. Veterans may have picked up desirable skills along the way, but it's not always easy to understand how to transfer them to a "normal" job. This week's talent and HR news weekly roundup features best practices in veteran recruiting - organizations and industries who are focused on recruiting veterans and ensuring their success in the civilian world.  

1) 25 Most Influential Companies for Veteran Hiring from Profiles in Diversity Journal

"Some of the most influential corporations in America today have helped to create transformational programs in the business community that are impacting lives and bringing together communities in support of our service members and their families. These organizations have a deeply rooted commitment to supporting like-minded organizations in their efforts to help veterans make the transition to a civilian workforce. Their efforts have helped to promote promising new approaches, create innovative tools and garner support for best practices more quickly, so that the entire business community can benefit."

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: The Future of Recruiting

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Talent and HR News Weekly Roundup: The Future of Recruiting

It’s no surprise that recruiting is evolving, and even changing as I write. Gone are the days when a simple newspaper ad brings in qualified candidates. Technology is making it easier to connect with and understand people. We have more access to data and people than ever before. This week’s roundup showcases some recent articles speaking to the future of recruiting. Fads? Or legitimate shifts in recruiting? 

1) 3 Things That Should Define the Future of Recruiting from TLNT

“The future of recruiting depends on the future of technology. As we’ve seen, man hangs on for dear life as technology progresses. The person (or company) who understands the progress of tomorrow will have a leg up on the competition.”

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How Recruiting Can Manage Change And Be A Partner

Many people will insist that the most important part of having a corporate recruiting team is to have a clearly defined structure, utilize metrics to drive business decisions, and to gather as much buy-in as possible throughout the organization to move initiatives forward. Most of that is absolutely correct. But what about when all of your best laid plans start to.....change? While having the clearly defined structure is important, it’s key to remember to be flexible and open to integrating change on an ad hoc basis. It’s critical to ensure that your teams are flexible with your recruiting programs, SOPs and approach to projects. There will be almost certainly be situations where you may need to change based on unexpected situations or business needs. 

For example, within your recruiting team there may be a certain process or chain for approving requisitions or offers. But department heads or other executives may determine that a different course of action may be required based on headcount needs. The process-driven recruiter in you wants to continue to instill process and order, but that just may not be feasible at the current moment.

Having a level of flexibility in situations like these actually helps you more than you might think. Executive teams recognize when they have team players who can be highly adaptable, and perceive them as strong business partners. Being viewed in such a way can be critical when you are trying to "sell" your department's initiatives. What I’ve learned over the years - sometimes the hard way - is that you just need to “play ball” sometimes and see how things turn out.

There are a few things to keep in mind the next time you encounter a situation where your recruitment team is having some change thrust upon it.

1. Keeping good metrics can help to draw tangible conclusions as to whether an experiment or pilot actually worked. It can also help to identify where the most/least successful areas are for making changes. As one of my former bosses told me “facts are our friends”. Feelings are not. People tend to ‘feel’ a lot of things in the hiring process : “it feels like this req has been open for 4 months” (and its been 17 days). This is the opportunity to influence change through facts.

2. Ask questions. Be sure to ask probing and clarifying questions when changes to your program are being suggested. This allows you to accomplish two things. First, it allows you to understand what the motives are behind the change, which could lead to additional solutions or parts of the solution. Secondly, it shows the other party that you are genuinely interested in how you can assist.

3. Remember that exhibiting flexibility puts you in a good light with your peers and executives. Executives tend to gravitate to those that they feel can be open-minded and those that they perceive are able to see the ‘big picture’.

4. Manage the change down. When working with your recruiting teams – if you want real buy-in – be sure to give them both the political side of the change and the action that needs to be taken in order to be successful. Challenge them to stretch themselves beyond their comfort zone and you may be surprised how many people embrace the change. Be approachable and willing resource who can answer questions throughout the change process.

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Pete Radloff is a Lead Consultant with exaqueo. You can connect with Pete on Twitter.  exaqueo is a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

 

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Should I Leave My Job?

A few weeks ago, we talked about a better way to quit your job when you just can’t handle it, rather than making a scene or spectacle. Spectacles aside, what if the reason you leave isn’t necessarily because you can’t stand your current job? As I dig into my first few weeks at exaqueo, I can’t help but reflect on how I arrived here and share the knowledge I gained through my most recent job switch, and the question I asked myself: "Should I leave my job?"

I left my last few jobs for amazing opportunities, all in line with my personal goals. It was heart wrenching to go into the offices of those who mentored me…gave me every opportunity to learn and grow…and explain to them that I was leaving. I’ll never forget what the President of one of my former companies asked me after I shared with him that I was leaving to pursue a new opportunity – “is this something you are walking towards or walking away from?”

What an interesting question. I hadn’t thought about it that way. Of course, from his perspective, if this was a job I was walking away from, he wanted to know why, and if there was anything he could have done better to keep me there. I was lucky to have an employer who cared enough to ask. It takes a strong leader to put himself in this vulnerable position and be open to criticism of a company he built.

This question has a lot of power.

Marketers constantly try to get into the heads of their customers. Employers should be doing the same, and get into the heads of their employees. With employee engagement at an all time low (according to Gallup), this question should be something leaders and managers ask themselves from the perspective of their employees, well before they are faced with someone leaving. Is there anything about my company - or the way that I manage - that may cause a high performer to walk away and is within my control? Are there consistencies among staff sentiment around our culture that may have a negative impact that I can get ahead of?

Anticipating these needs is important since we all know it’s extremely expensive to ignore them (according to Fast Company, roughly $370 Billion to be exact). This is especially important in startup and high-growth companies where the business is always evolving.

Sometimes people leave because it’s just not a good fit, and that’s valuable information to know from an employer perspective, so the next new hire IS a good fit. And sometimes, an employee leaves because of an amazing opportunity, and there’s nothing you could have done. If you have to lose employees, those are the kinds you want to lose.

As for me, joining exaqueo was something I walked (leaped!) towards. I’m very excited to join the team and contribute to this growing, inspiring company.

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Lexi Gordon is a Lead Consultant for exaqueo, a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact exaqueo to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

 

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There's a Better Way to Quit Your Job

Another day, another viral video of a frustrated, tired employee quitting a job in a dramatic fashion.  First there was the chute-sliding JetBlue flight attendant and then the brash marching band incident followed by the forthright op-ed from the ex-Goldman Sachs employee. And now there’s the dancing video producer who’s simply had enough.

In her case she claimed the work environment in Taiwan wasn’t bearable. So why not just move on? Or better yet, look for work opportunities in countries where employment laws and work environments generally tend to be a bit more supportive of work-life balance?

If only we could all vent this way. About everything. 

Public displays of resignation are entertaining and attention-getting. But they won’t take you anywhere except on the 15-minutes-of-fame-train. Look, we’ve all been there. I’ve had bosses throw things at me, yell, and storm out in temper tantrums. But employment is free will. And if you’re quitting anyway (meaning you’re not stuck in the job to feed your family), why behave like a toddler just looking for attention? I’m all for creative and sticking-it-to-the-man when deserved, but no one looks back on a tantrum with pride.

There’s a better way to quit your job if you just can’t take it anymore.

First, assess the situation.

Is your misery project or person related, but you love much about your company and co-workers? See if there’s an opportunity to move departments. It could be that management is well aware of your difficult boss (but she brings in too much business or is too tenured to fire). Not that it makes it right to keep the boss in seat, but without sharing confidential information, management could reward you for just asking for another opportunity internally.

If it’s systematic, then you may want to leave. When the entire founding team is behaving badly, or emulating a model of work-life balance you find deplorable, that’s a sign. And if your health or family life is being affected? That’s a sure sign. But only you can decide–and define–what behavior and cultural attributes are enough to make you quit.

Second, devise a plan and a timeline.

Consider current work you don’t want to leave unfinished and aim to help provide a smooth transition.  For example, you may despise your boss, but you don’t want to leave your reliable co-workers with a difficult situation. Then start laying the ground work (confidentially) with your network to get a sense of how hard it will be to find a new job so you’re financially prepared to be unemployed for a specific period of time. It’s important to know that even if you give two weeks notice, a company could ask you to leave on the spot–always be prepared for this...

Read the rest of this post over on Tech Cocktail.

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This post originally appeared on TechCocktail written by Susan LaMotte, the founder of exaqueo. A workforce consultancy, exaqueo helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Growing Your Startup or Small Business Edition

nick_lonesomeTree Startups and growing businesses talk about scale, sure. But when we think of scale, we often forget the trials and tribulations that scale brings, especially when it comes to talent. A few of us here at exaqueo had the opportunity to hear from LivingSocial CEO Tim O'Shaughnessy earlier this week talk about the difficulties of scaling his business.

And guess what?  His challenges were primarily people related.  In fact, LivingSocial went from 35 to 400 to 6000 employees in two years. I never thought I'd a founder talk about the challenges of labor laws. But alas, it's true.  If you really want to scale, you can't ignore the people factor. From hiring a team to your own people skills--it could make or break you. Seriously.

1) ADP Report: SMBs Created 102,000 Jobs in September from Accounting Web

"The September 2013 ADP National Employment Report revealed that small businesses added 74,000 new jobs: those with between one and nineteen employees saw 46,000 new jobs, while companies with twenty to forty-nine employees gained 28,000 jobs. Medium-sized businesses with fifty to 499 employees added 28,000 jobs."

 2) LivingSocial CEO Tim O'Shaughnessy Says People and Culture Keys to Success from Tech Cocktail

"In January 2010, LivingSocial’s employee base of thirty-five could easily fit in one room.  How things have changed in three short years.  They now have over 6,000 employees throughout twenty-seven countries.  They have officially reached the status of–in my own words–’huge-ass corporation’.  Despite these impressive numbers, they still operate as a startup in many ways.  In fact, O’Shaughnessy still considers the company a startup.  One point that he came back to several times during his chat with Frank was that even today the company is still working things out and making mistakes."

3) Ten Reasons You'll Never Raise a Dime for Your Startup from Forbes

"Your Leadership Skills Are Lacking:  Look in the mirror, because it starts with you. Trust me — you are more important than your idea. Every venture capitalist or angel (or bank) I know takes a hard look at the entrepreneur first. If your character, integrity or leadership is out of whack — you won’t get funded. So look hard and fix whatever is broken in that mirror."

4) Shifts Your Startup Needs to Make to Supercharge the Scaling Stage from BostInno

"At some point along this path, the startup begins to grow rapidly and all of a sudden your team in undermanned. You need more people, and you need them now. The rate of hiring speeds up; rather than welcoming a few people on to your team each year, you bring on a few each month. You no longer have the time to nurture your new employees and train them, resulting in lower quality hires and subsequently lower quality hiring processes.  Now that your company is scaling–not just growing–you’ll continuously be hiring, so you need to get good at it."

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exaqueo is a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Growing Your Startup or Small Business Edition

nick_lonesomeTree Startups and growing businesses talk about scale, sure. But when we think of scale, we often forget the trials and tribulations that scale brings, especially when it comes to talent. A few of us here at exaqueo had the opportunity to hear from LivingSocial CEO Tim O'Shaughnessy earlier this week talk about the difficulties of scaling his business.

And guess what?  His challenges were primarily people related.  In fact, LivingSocial went from 35 to 400 to 6000 employees in two years. I never thought I'd a founder talk about the challenges of labor laws. But alas, it's true.  If you really want to scale, you can't ignore the people factor. From hiring a team to your own people skills--it could make or break you. Seriously.

1) ADP Report: SMBs Created 102,000 Jobs in September from Accounting Web

"The September 2013 ADP National Employment Report revealed that small businesses added 74,000 new jobs: those with between one and nineteen employees saw 46,000 new jobs, while companies with twenty to forty-nine employees gained 28,000 jobs. Medium-sized businesses with fifty to 499 employees added 28,000 jobs."

 2) LivingSocial CEO Tim O'Shaughnessy Says People and Culture Keys to Success from Tech Cocktail

"In January 2010, LivingSocial’s employee base of thirty-five could easily fit in one room.  How things have changed in three short years.  They now have over 6,000 employees throughout twenty-seven countries.  They have officially reached the status of–in my own words–’huge-ass corporation’.  Despite these impressive numbers, they still operate as a startup in many ways.  In fact, O’Shaughnessy still considers the company a startup.  One point that he came back to several times during his chat with Frank was that even today the company is still working things out and making mistakes."

3) Ten Reasons You'll Never Raise a Dime for Your Startup from Forbes

"Your Leadership Skills Are Lacking:  Look in the mirror, because it starts with you. Trust me — you are more important than your idea. Every venture capitalist or angel (or bank) I know takes a hard look at the entrepreneur first. If your character, integrity or leadership is out of whack — you won’t get funded. So look hard and fix whatever is broken in that mirror."

4) Shifts Your Startup Needs to Make to Supercharge the Scaling Stage from BostInno

"At some point along this path, the startup begins to grow rapidly and all of a sudden your team in undermanned. You need more people, and you need them now. The rate of hiring speeds up; rather than welcoming a few people on to your team each year, you bring on a few each month. You no longer have the time to nurture your new employees and train them, resulting in lower quality hires and subsequently lower quality hiring processes.  Now that your company is scaling–not just growing–you’ll continuously be hiring, so you need to get good at it."

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exaqueo is a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Growing Your Startup or Small Business Edition

nick_lonesomeTree Startups and growing businesses talk about scale, sure. But when we think of scale, we often forget the trials and tribulations that scale brings, especially when it comes to talent. A few of us here at exaqueo had the opportunity to hear from LivingSocial CEO Tim O'Shaughnessy earlier this week talk about the difficulties of scaling his business.

And guess what?  His challenges were primarily people related.  In fact, LivingSocial went from 35 to 400 to 6000 employees in two years. I never thought I'd a founder talk about the challenges of labor laws. But alas, it's true.  If you really want to scale, you can't ignore the people factor. From hiring a team to your own people skills--it could make or break you. Seriously.

1) ADP Report: SMBs Created 102,000 Jobs in September from Accounting Web

"The September 2013 ADP National Employment Report revealed that small businesses added 74,000 new jobs: those with between one and nineteen employees saw 46,000 new jobs, while companies with twenty to forty-nine employees gained 28,000 jobs. Medium-sized businesses with fifty to 499 employees added 28,000 jobs."

 2) LivingSocial CEO Tim O'Shaughnessy Says People and Culture Keys to Success from Tech Cocktail

"In January 2010, LivingSocial’s employee base of thirty-five could easily fit in one room.  How things have changed in three short years.  They now have over 6,000 employees throughout twenty-seven countries.  They have officially reached the status of–in my own words–’huge-ass corporation’.  Despite these impressive numbers, they still operate as a startup in many ways.  In fact, O’Shaughnessy still considers the company a startup.  One point that he came back to several times during his chat with Frank was that even today the company is still working things out and making mistakes."

3) Ten Reasons You'll Never Raise a Dime for Your Startup from Forbes

"Your Leadership Skills Are Lacking:  Look in the mirror, because it starts with you. Trust me — you are more important than your idea. Every venture capitalist or angel (or bank) I know takes a hard look at the entrepreneur first. If your character, integrity or leadership is out of whack — you won’t get funded. So look hard and fix whatever is broken in that mirror."

4) Shifts Your Startup Needs to Make to Supercharge the Scaling Stage from BostInno

"At some point along this path, the startup begins to grow rapidly and all of a sudden your team in undermanned. You need more people, and you need them now. The rate of hiring speeds up; rather than welcoming a few people on to your team each year, you bring on a few each month. You no longer have the time to nurture your new employees and train them, resulting in lower quality hires and subsequently lower quality hiring processes.  Now that your company is scaling–not just growing–you’ll continuously be hiring, so you need to get good at it."

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exaqueo is a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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Recruiters, Why Don't We Scrum More?

Timely. Detailed. Manager. Feedback.

When you read that, you have one of two likely reactions. They are probably either "I'm sorry, what did you say? Was that English?" or "Oh, you mean when a manager says 'hmmm, Not a fit'". Let's face it, regardless of whether you are an internal or external recruiter, getting timely and detailed feedback and information is usually a challenge. Feedback and a solid heads up can very much resemble the purple squirrel we're all always in search of. So what can we do? We're all at the mercy of the hiring manager who makes the final call, right? Well, what if we turned the feedback model on it's head?

Many of you who recruit for technical and/or engineering roles are familiar with the Scrum development methodology. Not familiar? NO PROBLEM. It's not just for engineers! Scrum is a methodology that incorporates the idea of fast development cycles, frequent releases and quick stand-ups versus long, drawn out, "Death by Powerpoint" meetings. Hmm, maybe the developers are on to something here.

If we start to think and work like the client teams we're supporting, there's a greater chance of success of us getting what we need. For our purposes, let's focus on the quick standup here. Consider these outcomes as part of moving toward a more Scrum mentality when working with hiring managers:

Quicker Feedback

By scheduling 10-15 minute stand-ups on the books with hiring managers, you can get detailed feedback on phone interviews, submitted candidates, and any tweaks they want to make to the profile in real time. Also, with their schedules, 10-15 minutes is easier than 30-60 minutes. Now you can get the info you need to pivot, or to keep the trains moving forward with candidates. And at the end of the day, quick feedback is an integral part of any candidate experience.

Work How They Work

Eternally, recruiters are trying to move to a model where they "have a seat at the table" so that they can be seen as business partners versus order takers. This is an ideal way to show that you get it. You understand how quick they need to move, and you want to work within those parameters.

Client Service & Personal Touch

Scrums are a much more effective way to have a personal touch point with your managers. Seeing their recruiter frequently helps build familiarity, and familiarity breeds trust. Respecting their time, and still getting what you need is a win-win for both sides. And let's be real.....no one reads emails. A harsh truth, but a truth nonetheless. And isn't 15 minutes talking better spent than say, 4 hours a week playing email tag?

Stay On Top Of The Needs

In addition to having your Scrum meeting with your managers, try to join in on a couple of the development scrums. Sure, most of what is discussed will not apply directly to recruiting. But during those meetings, occasionally the future needs are discussed, or they talk about where they are bottlenecked and may need additional heads. This my friends, is proactive recruiting at it's genesis. Again, it's part of building a sense of trust among not only the managers, but the team as well.

This might be most useful in the technical arena, but it can definitely be parlayed across multiple business units with some modifications. And, since we're all looking to show that we can help drive the business, this is a potentially helpful way to demonstrate that to you teams.

Have you incorporated this at your organization? I'd love to hear your take on this.

Here are a couple of fun takes on incorporating Scrum in your process:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oheekef7oJk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBKuYzqvZmI

 

Pete Radloff is a Lead Consultant with exaqueo. You can connect with Pete on Twitter.

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exaqueo is a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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