Human Resources Today

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Employment Law Q&A with Rebecca Signer Roche

Startups and small companies don’t always have dedicated HR resources who can stay on top of employment law or enroll a lawyer to help with HR matters. To help understand common hurdles and trends for startups and small businesses related to employment law, we recently touched base with Rebecca Signer Roche, Senior Counsel on all labor and employment matters for DynCorp International. Previously, Rebecca was a labor and employment attorney at Littler Mendelson, P.C., and at McGuireWoods, LLP.

Lexi Gordon, exaqueo (LG): Thanks for taking the time to chat with us. I think many small and growing companies aren't aware of just how important HR law is when it comes to building a business and managing risk. First things first, when it comes to employment law, what are the most common issues/concerns you see with newer and/or small companies?

Rebecca Signer Roche (RSR): Here’s a list of the most common issues and concerns I’ve seen with those types of companies:

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Startup Culture: Q&A with Trupanion’s Darryl Rawlings

Dog A recent Wall Street Journal blog post talked about the fight for talent at startups. The blogger, Neil Blumenthal (Co-Founder and Co-Chief Executive Officer of Warby Parker), said, “The first step toward finding the right people is to have a deep understanding of your company’s identity.” This couldn’t be more true.

Darryl Rawlings, CEO of Trupanion (a pet insurance company whose mission is to help pets receive the best veterinary care possible), believes this to be true as well. Continuing with our Q&A series with startup leaders, today I’m sharing Mr. Rawlings  views on startup culture in his growing company and the role of Trupanion’s identity in hiring talent.

exaqueo: Does your company have a stated set of cultural values?

Darryl Rawlings, Trupanion (DR): Yes. They are: 1. We do what we say; 2. Simple is better (which is why we have one simple pet insurance plan); 3. Do not punish unlucky pets (meaning pet owners and their pets do not get punished with fees, restrictions, etc. for making claims. We want them to make claims! That’s what we’re here for!); 4. Do not be insurance-like. Be innovative and fair; 5. and We love our pets! And if you don’t, it was nice meeting you; however, you’re not a good fit for our company.

exaqueo: Can you describe your corporate culture in three words?

DR: Original, Fun, Passionate.

exaqueo: When you have made an effort to understand and strengthen your culture, what did you learn the most?

DR: I learned that the stronger the culture, the happier the team. And the happier the team, the happier they’ll make your clients.

exaqueo: What have you learned about the importance of culture that you can apply to the work you do for your clients?

DR: In my business it’s extremely important for every team member from the bottom to the top to be passionate about pets. Their passion for pets makes them passionate for clients pets. When you care about your work like we do, you do better work.

exaqueo: How do you manage having the right talent to meet rapid growth?

DR: When you’re growing as rapidly as we are, you don’t just find good leaders; you find leaders who will strive to create other leaders. Team work is important too, we only hire team players. We’re constantly on the lookout and keeping our eyes peeled for good talent. We spread the word about our company and network our tails off. It’s paid off over the years as we’re getting more people excited about our company and wanting to work with us. It helps our recruiters with candidates knocking on our doors versus the other way around.

exaqueo: Why does talent + culture fit matter?

DR: For Trupanion, the talent absolutely has to fit our culture (pet-friendly culture) or they simply won’t be able to fully understand the value we are offering pet owners. You don’t get the same high quality work from workers who don’t fit well. Quality is low and that worker’s future opportunities in the company are low too because they simply don’t fit our values. When I was raising capital for Trupanion, I brought a variety of big hitters into a room together. I asked them all to raise their hand if they had a pet. For those without their hands raised, I asked them to leave, because unfortunately, they just won’t get what we do. And I made them leave. I require everyone who joins our Board of Directors to own a pet.

Lexi Gordon is a Lead Consultant for exaqueo, a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact exaqueo to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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Cultivating a Culture of Feedback

  It’s that time of year where you reflect on what worked and what didn’t in the previous year, and you begin to think about what’s ahead of you in this next year. This is the perfect time for feedback, formally or informally.

Blog_2_Feedback_IMAGE

Or is it? Is there a reason we look at a new year as a clean slate? I do it too. I indulge from Thanksgiving until New Year’s Day and then decide January 1 will be the day I start fresh.

There are plenty of articles out there advising on the delivery of feedback and its art form. These are extremely helpful because giving feedback, especially constructive, is a difficult conversation. What I’m imparting here is making feedback a mindset. If you want to cultivate a culture of feedback to engage employees and enhance productivity, there are 3 overarching elements to incorporating it, and it doesn’t mean just at performance review time.

Frequent

Feedback should not be reserved for the performance review. Managers should be offering it, and employees should be seeking it…often. High performing teams conduct a feedback routine called a Hot Wash after every major event to evaluate performance. Derived from the U.S. Army, "the term Hot Wash comes from the practice used by some soldiers of dousing their weapons in extremely hot water as a means of removing grit and residue after firing…One infantry soldier described it as ‘the quick and dirty cleaning that can save a lot of time later.’” (Source: US Department of Defense Education Activity).

Instead of waiting until the end of year, feedback should be provided frequently as a way to constantly adjust and save time in the long run. Startups use this concept with their products – obtaining constant feedback and tweaking as the market responds. Why not use this with your people?

Honest

Over the holidays, a friend shared that he was frustrated with his company’s review process. Throughout the year, he received very positive feedback and then at the end of the year - the time where it counts the most for bonus distribution – he received some negative feedback that impacted his bonus. He was actively seeking it out, and willing to work on his shortcomings, but he had no awareness. His managers were not doing him any favors by sugarcoating their feedback throughout the year.

Understood

Oftentimes feedback can be misconstrued. It’s not fun to be told you aren’t doing something well. You feel judged, scolded, and wrong. But if someone knew where the feedback was coming from, it may change how she receives it. I worked at a company where feedback was ingrained in the culture. During my interview, an employee explained that “feedback is love.” How refreshing! I knew that when someone offered me feedback, it was because they cared about me and wanted me to improve. And when I was on the delivery end of constructive feedback, the person receiving it would understand that I was genuinely looking out for her. You wouldn’t hesitate to tell your friend that she has ketchup on her chin so that she doesn’t embarrass herself, so why wouldn’t you tell a colleague that she takes on too much to please everyone. It’s not passing judgment, it’s making someone aware of areas that can vastly improve her life. Working in a company that had this openness was freeing. I never felt judged or wrong. I felt cared for and free to take risks.

Regardless of the type of culture you have, formal or informal, feedback is something that everyone deserves, and it should be frequent, honest, and understood.

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Lexi Gordon is a Lead Consultant for exaqueo, a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact exaqueo to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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Startup Culture: Q&A with SocialRadar's Michael Chasen

Let’s face it, culture’s hot right now. From Zappos and Netflix to Hubspot and Google, founders are eager to create their own manifestos and espouse a cool culture. I’m constantly reminding clients that it takes more than a list of values to create a culture. The values have to become part of the everyday of your organization. And that means you have to hold employees accountable for them. At exaqueo, we call them work rules. It’s how our clients go beyond a list of core values and cool perks to a culture that really sustains. As founders, sustainability is the model we should be emulating. So I’m always seeking founders who are making that happen–creating a culture that lives, breathes and sustains. This week, I caught up with one founder who’s doing just that.

Michael Chasen is the founder and CEO of SocialRadar and former founder and CEO of Blackboard, Inc. SocialRadar aggregates existing social data to better connect users in real-time, in real places. With almost $13 million in funding earlier this year, SocialRadar’s growing fast. That’s where culture comes in, and Michael knows the importance of getting it right, now.

Susan LaMotte, exaqueo (SL): Does your company have a stated set of cultural values?

Michael Chasen, Social Radar (MC): Indeed, and we worked hard to create it. An introduction to our culture.

SL: When you made the effort to understand and strengthen your culture, what did you learn the most?

MC: When we started the company, we knew that culture was going to be an important component of a successful team and product. We didn’t leave our culture to chance; instead we called upon various influences to establish it and put it in writing for all on board to refer to. It’s one thing to say that teamwork is important, but it’s another to operationalize the company to support that—for example, we have fixed “work late nights” and team outings. In other words, we have both scheduled group overtime and scheduled group fun time. We offer perks such as gym membership, healthy dinners on work late nights, and general flexibility with hours to show our commitment to a work-life balance.

SL: That’s so true–you have to have examples of the values in practice to make them come alive.  What will you do to grow the company you want to grow?

MC: If you build it, they will come, right? We are pouring our energy into fine-tuning a product that is not only cool but ultimately indispensable. Even our marketing team would admit that word of mouth can be more powerful than any planned campaign...

…continue reading the rest of this post over on Tech Cocktail where it was originally posted.

Susan LaMotte is the founder of exaqueo, a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact exaqueo to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce strategy that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Growing Your Startup or Small Business Edition

nick_lonesomeTree Startups and growing businesses talk about scale, sure. But when we think of scale, we often forget the trials and tribulations that scale brings, especially when it comes to talent. A few of us here at exaqueo had the opportunity to hear from LivingSocial CEO Tim O'Shaughnessy earlier this week talk about the difficulties of scaling his business.

And guess what?  His challenges were primarily people related.  In fact, LivingSocial went from 35 to 400 to 6000 employees in two years. I never thought I'd a founder talk about the challenges of labor laws. But alas, it's true.  If you really want to scale, you can't ignore the people factor. From hiring a team to your own people skills--it could make or break you. Seriously.

1) ADP Report: SMBs Created 102,000 Jobs in September from Accounting Web

"The September 2013 ADP National Employment Report revealed that small businesses added 74,000 new jobs: those with between one and nineteen employees saw 46,000 new jobs, while companies with twenty to forty-nine employees gained 28,000 jobs. Medium-sized businesses with fifty to 499 employees added 28,000 jobs."

 2) LivingSocial CEO Tim O'Shaughnessy Says People and Culture Keys to Success from Tech Cocktail

"In January 2010, LivingSocial’s employee base of thirty-five could easily fit in one room.  How things have changed in three short years.  They now have over 6,000 employees throughout twenty-seven countries.  They have officially reached the status of–in my own words–’huge-ass corporation’.  Despite these impressive numbers, they still operate as a startup in many ways.  In fact, O’Shaughnessy still considers the company a startup.  One point that he came back to several times during his chat with Frank was that even today the company is still working things out and making mistakes."

3) Ten Reasons You'll Never Raise a Dime for Your Startup from Forbes

"Your Leadership Skills Are Lacking:  Look in the mirror, because it starts with you. Trust me — you are more important than your idea. Every venture capitalist or angel (or bank) I know takes a hard look at the entrepreneur first. If your character, integrity or leadership is out of whack — you won’t get funded. So look hard and fix whatever is broken in that mirror."

4) Shifts Your Startup Needs to Make to Supercharge the Scaling Stage from BostInno

"At some point along this path, the startup begins to grow rapidly and all of a sudden your team in undermanned. You need more people, and you need them now. The rate of hiring speeds up; rather than welcoming a few people on to your team each year, you bring on a few each month. You no longer have the time to nurture your new employees and train them, resulting in lower quality hires and subsequently lower quality hiring processes.  Now that your company is scaling–not just growing–you’ll continuously be hiring, so you need to get good at it."

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exaqueo is a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Growing Your Startup or Small Business Edition

nick_lonesomeTree Startups and growing businesses talk about scale, sure. But when we think of scale, we often forget the trials and tribulations that scale brings, especially when it comes to talent. A few of us here at exaqueo had the opportunity to hear from LivingSocial CEO Tim O'Shaughnessy earlier this week talk about the difficulties of scaling his business.

And guess what?  His challenges were primarily people related.  In fact, LivingSocial went from 35 to 400 to 6000 employees in two years. I never thought I'd a founder talk about the challenges of labor laws. But alas, it's true.  If you really want to scale, you can't ignore the people factor. From hiring a team to your own people skills--it could make or break you. Seriously.

1) ADP Report: SMBs Created 102,000 Jobs in September from Accounting Web

"The September 2013 ADP National Employment Report revealed that small businesses added 74,000 new jobs: those with between one and nineteen employees saw 46,000 new jobs, while companies with twenty to forty-nine employees gained 28,000 jobs. Medium-sized businesses with fifty to 499 employees added 28,000 jobs."

 2) LivingSocial CEO Tim O'Shaughnessy Says People and Culture Keys to Success from Tech Cocktail

"In January 2010, LivingSocial’s employee base of thirty-five could easily fit in one room.  How things have changed in three short years.  They now have over 6,000 employees throughout twenty-seven countries.  They have officially reached the status of–in my own words–’huge-ass corporation’.  Despite these impressive numbers, they still operate as a startup in many ways.  In fact, O’Shaughnessy still considers the company a startup.  One point that he came back to several times during his chat with Frank was that even today the company is still working things out and making mistakes."

3) Ten Reasons You'll Never Raise a Dime for Your Startup from Forbes

"Your Leadership Skills Are Lacking:  Look in the mirror, because it starts with you. Trust me — you are more important than your idea. Every venture capitalist or angel (or bank) I know takes a hard look at the entrepreneur first. If your character, integrity or leadership is out of whack — you won’t get funded. So look hard and fix whatever is broken in that mirror."

4) Shifts Your Startup Needs to Make to Supercharge the Scaling Stage from BostInno

"At some point along this path, the startup begins to grow rapidly and all of a sudden your team in undermanned. You need more people, and you need them now. The rate of hiring speeds up; rather than welcoming a few people on to your team each year, you bring on a few each month. You no longer have the time to nurture your new employees and train them, resulting in lower quality hires and subsequently lower quality hiring processes.  Now that your company is scaling–not just growing–you’ll continuously be hiring, so you need to get good at it."

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exaqueo is a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Growing Your Startup or Small Business Edition

nick_lonesomeTree Startups and growing businesses talk about scale, sure. But when we think of scale, we often forget the trials and tribulations that scale brings, especially when it comes to talent. A few of us here at exaqueo had the opportunity to hear from LivingSocial CEO Tim O'Shaughnessy earlier this week talk about the difficulties of scaling his business.

And guess what?  His challenges were primarily people related.  In fact, LivingSocial went from 35 to 400 to 6000 employees in two years. I never thought I'd a founder talk about the challenges of labor laws. But alas, it's true.  If you really want to scale, you can't ignore the people factor. From hiring a team to your own people skills--it could make or break you. Seriously.

1) ADP Report: SMBs Created 102,000 Jobs in September from Accounting Web

"The September 2013 ADP National Employment Report revealed that small businesses added 74,000 new jobs: those with between one and nineteen employees saw 46,000 new jobs, while companies with twenty to forty-nine employees gained 28,000 jobs. Medium-sized businesses with fifty to 499 employees added 28,000 jobs."

 2) LivingSocial CEO Tim O'Shaughnessy Says People and Culture Keys to Success from Tech Cocktail

"In January 2010, LivingSocial’s employee base of thirty-five could easily fit in one room.  How things have changed in three short years.  They now have over 6,000 employees throughout twenty-seven countries.  They have officially reached the status of–in my own words–’huge-ass corporation’.  Despite these impressive numbers, they still operate as a startup in many ways.  In fact, O’Shaughnessy still considers the company a startup.  One point that he came back to several times during his chat with Frank was that even today the company is still working things out and making mistakes."

3) Ten Reasons You'll Never Raise a Dime for Your Startup from Forbes

"Your Leadership Skills Are Lacking:  Look in the mirror, because it starts with you. Trust me — you are more important than your idea. Every venture capitalist or angel (or bank) I know takes a hard look at the entrepreneur first. If your character, integrity or leadership is out of whack — you won’t get funded. So look hard and fix whatever is broken in that mirror."

4) Shifts Your Startup Needs to Make to Supercharge the Scaling Stage from BostInno

"At some point along this path, the startup begins to grow rapidly and all of a sudden your team in undermanned. You need more people, and you need them now. The rate of hiring speeds up; rather than welcoming a few people on to your team each year, you bring on a few each month. You no longer have the time to nurture your new employees and train them, resulting in lower quality hires and subsequently lower quality hiring processes.  Now that your company is scaling–not just growing–you’ll continuously be hiring, so you need to get good at it."

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exaqueo is a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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Caring About Employees Isn't a Talent Strategy

Almost every founder has the same mentality: talent can make or break your business. From finding the best talent to maintaining a strong culture, founders regularly wax poetic about how much they care about their people and their culture. We all know that people and culture matter. The real question is what are you doing about it? 

Founders and leadership teams talk culture and people but rarely have an actual strategy in place.  They’ve got values, cool perks, and equity packages to offer.  But ask what the strategy is, and they fall silent.

Let me be clear: caring about employees isn’t a talent strategy. Imagine if you rolled out new product features just because you thought they’d make your users happy. Engineers everywhere know there has to be a roadmap.  You don’t add new features to make users happy if they’re not part of a plan to grow your user base or you know they’ll be outdated in six months.  Product development conversations are tied to revenue, growth and vision.

So why don’t startup leaders think about talent in the same way? Founders and investors don’t know how. But when they do, it changes everything.

Enter Dan Berger, CEO of Social Tables. Unlike most founders, Dan has both work experience in HR and has sought out mentors with HR experience. He uses terms like “hiring yield” and “employer of choice” regularly in conversation. More importantly, he doesn’t just care about his employees and culture. He can answer the question, “What are you doing about it?”

Social Tables is putting rigor into their hiring process. They’re starting to track employee satisfaction and aligning business goals directly with individual employee performance. They’re building out a competency model for their sales team so they can hire, coach and develop around specific success drivers.

Sound too corporate? Too formal? Too focused for a startup that should be spending time on product and growth. Try again and ...

Read the rest of this post over on Tech Cocktail.

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This post originally appeared on TechCocktail written by Susan LaMotte, the founder of exaqueo. A workforce consultancy, exaqueo helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Dealing With Difficult Employees When You Don't Have Time

There's a great scene in Shrek when Lord Farquaad breaks off the legs of the Gingerbread Man, basically torturing him for information. Gingy refuses to divulge anything until Lord Farquaad goes for the jugular reaching for his candy buttons. "NO! Not the buttons! Not my gumdrop buttons!," Gingy cries and gives in. This is how leaders of growing companies deal with talent problems. You wait until it's going to cause you real pain. Fundraising or new hire? Client problem or co-worker disagreement? Valuation or toxic employee? When you're focusing on getting investment, customers, attention and Board approval, there's no time for talent. Until there has to be.

But you don't have to wait until it's gumdrop buttons serious. You can manage talent while you're running a business.  And you can handle difficult employees before you get to the point where you're ready to break their legs off. Or where your other employees just want to run.

Deal With It Now

If there's a problem, deal with it in 24 hours. Don't cancel an investment pitch for a difficult employee, but don't ignore the problem for days or weeks either. That demonstrates to other employees that the behavior is tolerated. It also means you forget what exactly happened and move on to putting out other fires. No matter how busy you are, ask the employee for time to talk in the next 24 hours and make it happen.

Give Regular Feedback From Day One

If you bring employees on board, focus on execution and never give them feedback on what's working and what's not, the first time you tell them there's a problem, it's defensive city. They're surprised, you're annoyed and the chasm of communication breakdown gets wider and wider.

From day one, tell new employees when they'll get feedback and how it will be delivered. Share things they are doing well and things they need to improve on. And then actually do it. Regularly. It makes it easier when things get tough, for the tough messages to be delivered. Employees will be used to the conversations -- even if they're on the fly -- and be prepared to ask questions and won't be caught off guard.

Use Your Culture to Make Your Case

Without values modeled by the leadership team, culture is just a collection of silly perks and CEO sound bytes. If you have a set of values and what exaqueo calls work rules, you can always point back to them as a guidepost of how business gets done in your organization.

For example, let's say transparency is one of your core values and you have an associated work rule that describes how and when employees need to be transparent. Then, when an employee hides something or doesn't want to admit there's a problem, you point back to the work rule. If they can't adapt, they're out. Otherwise your trading commitment to culture for one person.

Don't Hide Behind Technology

As founders or leaders, we're always on the fly. I'm writing this blog post from an airport lounge! But that doesn't mean I should text an employee if there's a problem, or shoot off an email, hit send, and shut down the computer. Feedback has to be a two-way street real-time. A ten-minute phone call now will save you five emails later and an employee so frustrated, stewing about the feedback that he doesn't focus for the rest of the day. Always direct, always in-person (or on the phone)--the only way to give feedback.

Give Employees a Chance, But Not More Than One

An employee who makes a mistake can learn and change. A toxic employee can't. That's why multiple chances don't work. Don't count to three or give start-up employees long leashes. You don't have time for that. Instead, be clear about the problem, connect it back to your culture and be honest that you don't have time for it to happen again. Encourage communication--if they aren't sure what to do, ask! But don't give out chances like candy.

You may be able to ignore or de-prioritize difficult employees until they cause a major problem. But waiting means the problem is now big enough to really impact your business.  Do you have time for that? Don't cut off your legs to spite your face. And by all means, don't wait until it gets this serious.

http://youtu.be/FpBJih02aYU

 

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exaqueo is a workforce consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

 

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Understanding Candidates Edition

Screen Shot 2013-09-06 at 3.25.43 PM Remember that Mel Gibson movie where he can foretell what women want? Imagine that power in the workplace. We think we know what job seekers want but we're never really sure.  But understanding candidates might be the next best thing. We can't get supernatural powers in the blink of an eye, but we can pay attention to what candidates are learning.  This week's roundup is a collection of stories to help you understand what candidates are reading and learning. It may give you the insight you need into your hiring strategy!

1) How Not To Reject Job Candidates at The Fast Track

"[Don't reject them] by phone. You might think that it’s polite to phone candidates to let them know they didn’t get the job, but resist that impulse and send an email instead. Phone calls put candidates on the spot: They have to react to the rejection while they’re still in the immediate moment of disappointment. It’s awkward. And the call often creates a moment of false hope, which then dissipates when the candidate has to pull it together to be gracious about disappointment seconds later. (Besides, email is better on your side too, since some candidates will try to argue your decision.)"

2) 5 Things You Should Look For in Your First Job at Brazen Careerist

"Early in your career, the most important thing you can do is gain as much experience as possible. Even if you secure a job in your desired field, you won’t be in the same position forever. To advance, it’s important to have a variety of experiences under your belt.  Before you accept a position, consider what kinds of experience you’ll gain. If you’ll be working in publishing, for example, will you be working with the Adobe Creative Suite? Will you also be able to learn new skills such as website design or pagination? No matter what direction your career goes, it never hurts to have skills in multiple areas."

3) 5 Ways to Get More Out of LinkedIn at Time

"This is a great opportunity to let prospective employers see your crowning achievement or even an award you’ve won. It works with a wide range of formats including PDFs, Power Point Presentations, pictures and videos. However, it won’t generate an image of a website or blog. If you want to show that off, you can always take a screenshot of it and upload that."

4) Ten Recruiters Share How to Impress at Glassdoor

"Candidates are getting more and more creative with getting attention.  I’ve been impressed with several candidates recently who have built infographics, videos and even full blown websites to convey their experience!  I’m a sucker for creative people with an awesome design sense.  But, this is not required to get the job.  Not everybody has these skills and we always go for the best person for the job.  As long as you are applying online and convey your experience, passion and goals clearly, you’ll have a fair shot at getting into the adidas Group."

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exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Understanding Candidates Edition

Screen Shot 2013-09-06 at 3.25.43 PM Remember that Mel Gibson movie where he can foretell what women want? Imagine that power in the workplace. We think we know what job seekers want but we're never really sure.  But understanding candidates might be the next best thing. We can't get supernatural powers in the blink of an eye, but we can pay attention to what candidates are learning.  This week's roundup is a collection of stories to help you understand what candidates are reading and learning. It may give you the insight you need into your hiring strategy!

1) How Not To Reject Job Candidates at The Fast Track

"[Don't reject them] by phone. You might think that it’s polite to phone candidates to let them know they didn’t get the job, but resist that impulse and send an email instead. Phone calls put candidates on the spot: They have to react to the rejection while they’re still in the immediate moment of disappointment. It’s awkward. And the call often creates a moment of false hope, which then dissipates when the candidate has to pull it together to be gracious about disappointment seconds later. (Besides, email is better on your side too, since some candidates will try to argue your decision.)"

2) 5 Things You Should Look For in Your First Job at Brazen Careerist

"Early in your career, the most important thing you can do is gain as much experience as possible. Even if you secure a job in your desired field, you won’t be in the same position forever. To advance, it’s important to have a variety of experiences under your belt.  Before you accept a position, consider what kinds of experience you’ll gain. If you’ll be working in publishing, for example, will you be working with the Adobe Creative Suite? Will you also be able to learn new skills such as website design or pagination? No matter what direction your career goes, it never hurts to have skills in multiple areas."

3) 5 Ways to Get More Out of LinkedIn at Time

"This is a great opportunity to let prospective employers see your crowning achievement or even an award you’ve won. It works with a wide range of formats including PDFs, Power Point Presentations, pictures and videos. However, it won’t generate an image of a website or blog. If you want to show that off, you can always take a screenshot of it and upload that."

4) Ten Recruiters Share How to Impress at Glassdoor

"Candidates are getting more and more creative with getting attention.  I’ve been impressed with several candidates recently who have built infographics, videos and even full blown websites to convey their experience!  I’m a sucker for creative people with an awesome design sense.  But, this is not required to get the job.  Not everybody has these skills and we always go for the best person for the job.  As long as you are applying online and convey your experience, passion and goals clearly, you’ll have a fair shot at getting into the adidas Group."

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exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Understanding Candidates Edition

Screen Shot 2013-09-06 at 3.25.43 PM Remember that Mel Gibson movie where he can foretell what women want? Imagine that power in the workplace. We think we know what job seekers want but we're never really sure.  But understanding candidates might be the next best thing. We can't get supernatural powers in the blink of an eye, but we can pay attention to what candidates are learning.  This week's roundup is a collection of stories to help you understand what candidates are reading and learning. It may give you the insight you need into your hiring strategy!

1) How Not To Reject Job Candidates at The Fast Track

"[Don't reject them] by phone. You might think that it’s polite to phone candidates to let them know they didn’t get the job, but resist that impulse and send an email instead. Phone calls put candidates on the spot: They have to react to the rejection while they’re still in the immediate moment of disappointment. It’s awkward. And the call often creates a moment of false hope, which then dissipates when the candidate has to pull it together to be gracious about disappointment seconds later. (Besides, email is better on your side too, since some candidates will try to argue your decision.)"

2) 5 Things You Should Look For in Your First Job at Brazen Careerist

"Early in your career, the most important thing you can do is gain as much experience as possible. Even if you secure a job in your desired field, you won’t be in the same position forever. To advance, it’s important to have a variety of experiences under your belt.  Before you accept a position, consider what kinds of experience you’ll gain. If you’ll be working in publishing, for example, will you be working with the Adobe Creative Suite? Will you also be able to learn new skills such as website design or pagination? No matter what direction your career goes, it never hurts to have skills in multiple areas."

3) 5 Ways to Get More Out of LinkedIn at Time

"This is a great opportunity to let prospective employers see your crowning achievement or even an award you’ve won. It works with a wide range of formats including PDFs, Power Point Presentations, pictures and videos. However, it won’t generate an image of a website or blog. If you want to show that off, you can always take a screenshot of it and upload that."

4) Ten Recruiters Share How to Impress at Glassdoor

"Candidates are getting more and more creative with getting attention.  I’ve been impressed with several candidates recently who have built infographics, videos and even full blown websites to convey their experience!  I’m a sucker for creative people with an awesome design sense.  But, this is not required to get the job.  Not everybody has these skills and we always go for the best person for the job.  As long as you are applying online and convey your experience, passion and goals clearly, you’ll have a fair shot at getting into the adidas Group."

—-

exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to scale the right way.

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5 Ways to Save Money on Your Hiring Strategy Now

Ask your average corporate recruiter, and they’ll scoff at startups having trouble hiring great talent. But what they don’t realize is the numerous obstacles that face growing companies when it comes to hiring the best people. Startups are burdened by a lack of time to devote to the hiring process. And in many cities, they often have trouble finding highly skilled technical talent willing to take a risk and join a startup – even one with incredible potential.

Plus, it’s really hard to compete against big, local brands offering higher pay, fewer hours, and better benefits. And technical talent often prefer the flexibility of freelance roles where they can manage time, costs, and the type of projects they work on.

Startups often turn to headhunters in desperation. But there’s one problem: headhunters cost an arm and a leg. Specifically 15-30 percent+ of the new hire’s salary. For a developer, that can run more than $10,000 or more based on the level and the city. Plus they aren’t always looking out for the startup’s best interests. They want to make the placement and get the cash. They’re not incented to care about long-term fit or performance.

Instead of passing the buck and sucking up the contingency fees, there are cheaper and easier ways to find the talent you need:

1. Hire an Internal Recruiter or Two

If you’re going to hire at least two people in the next 12 months, it’s a worthwhile investment based on what you’ll spend for a headhunter. It takes the burden of managing the process off of the leadership team, and the recruiters can also begin to help you manage the team and growth.

2. Use Sourcing Tools and Searches

Forget expensive job boards. Use your current developers to use unique search strings and do some advanced online searching for candidates you wouldn’t find otherwise. For example, one of Facebook’s best engineers came from a small, no-name web shop in Maine who wouldn’t have been found locally.

Or, make a small investment in a tool like RemarkableHire that combs niche tech sites like StackOverflow and Dribbble to find actual evidence of performance and tech knowledge rather than the self-professed Hadoop expert you find on LinkedIn.

3. Get the Whole Team Involved

This isn’t an employee referral contest. Require team members to participate in the search for every new hire and offer up three candidates for each open position...Read More Over on TechCocktail.

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This post originally appeared on TechCocktail written by Susan LaMotte, the founder of exaqueo. A human resources consultancy, exaqueo helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Stop Working, Take Vacation and Set an Example

Image When I read this piece on busyness from Meredith Fineman in Harvard Business Review my immediate reaction was guilty as charged.  She's describing me and one of my worst faults. I'm always busy, always working, and always telling people about it. While I like to think of myself as self-aware (I know many of my greatest strengths and deepest weaknesses) sometimes you need a wake-up call.  That can come in the form of reading, listening, asking ("am I missing something") or the ever-valuable-when-done-right upward feedback.

So where does it come from? Sure, I can harbor much of the blame. So can society, the American business landscape, even #startuplife. Entrepreneurs especially feel the need to be busy all of the time and when things slow, feel a sense of laziness.I won't argue with the value of taking a break. But I will remind you leaders out there: it's also your fault. We're terrible at modeling good behavior, especially when it comes to taking a break.  We push for our team to take vacation, but do we check to see who actually does? It's cool for startups to offer unlimited vacation days, but are any actually required?  We might not expect our teams to answer emails nights and weekends, but we send them anyway.

I last wrote about the importance of role models in my Forbes piece about women in the workplace where I lamented my personal lack of role models in my own career. Part of the problem for me was the workload, the badge of honor that seemed to come with long hours and being busy all the time. I didn't want it then and I don't want it now.

So why do I still do it?

Part of it is the entrepreneurial push and part is the role my business plays in my life. It's an important part of me. But saying I'm busy all the time, or feeling the pressure to always be working doesn't make for better work. So it's time to stop.

I took all of Labor Day weekend off (enjoy my view above).  Every single, solitary second. I didn't plan on it, but the outcome was more than I could have imagined. A clearer head. A fresher perspective. A calmer mind. A motivated Tuesday. And I plan to do it again later this year. Several times. I'll take a cue from my own missteps. This isn't just about working when I want or working all the time. It's the portion of my brain that's occupied with work. It's working smarter and better.

This last quarter of the year has to be productive for all of us, but there's also a ton of holiday and vacation time to be had. I wanted a life as an entrepreneur. In fact, I left the corporate world for it. Now it's time to make sure I don't revert to old habits, and, feel the need to tell everyone all the time.

As for you? Are you guilty even in the slightest? Don't tell me you're too busy to make a change. Be a role model. Model the time off for your team and see real results when they follow in your more relaxed and productive footsteps.

 

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exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Supporting Your Employees Edition

Last week we talked about the oft-overlooked yet major necessity in startup and high-growth companies: employee feedback. This week, we're taking that a step further. Feedback is just the baseline requirement with your employees. You also owe them some support, coaching and development along the way.  That's not to say they shouldn't take ownership of their own careers and development. They should. But you need to show them how.  Supporting your employees is part of your job even if your company is three people. This week we've rounded up some advice for you as managers and some links to pass along to your team. Feedback is the beginning, follow-through, learning, growth and development is another.

For your team:

1) Four Ways to Advance Your Career at a Startup at The Daily Muse

"At a start-up, there’s always way more to do than people to get it done. So, think about the types of people your company would hire if the company was twice the size, choose an area that you’d like to learn about, and suggest a project to the founders. For example, if your company has talked about building out a sales team in the future and you’d love to get exposure in that area, offer to test out the viability of sales as a customer acquisition strategy. As long as you’re still performing in your core role, your manager will probably be happy to have the extra help—and you’ll have the chance to build out a new skill set."

2) Why Your Boss Still Hasn't Promoted You at The Fast Track

"Do you take feedback well, or get huffy and pout or gripe about any criticism? You’ve got to develop thicker skin the higher you go on the career ladder, so an inability to accept feedback professionally could be sending the message you’re immature and not ready to play with the big kids."

For you:

3) Managing with Empathy at Medium

"As you might imagine, the work days at Obama for America (the president’s 2012 reëlection campaign) were long, with good reason. But it takes its toll on people over time. My colleague Lauren Peterson came up with the idea of guaranteeing folks two nights each week that, no matter what, they’d be out the door by 8 p.m. We quickly adopted this on my team and referred to it as “time to do human things”. A few people asked me if they could come in at noon instead. That let them pay bills, buy groceries or just get some much needed sleep. The “in by noon” option quickly became the more popular choice."

4) How to Write a Love Letter to Your Future Startup Employee at Tech Cocktail

"... explain how you will show employees how your startup values their talent, work ethic, and dedication. Consider the following questions for inspiration writing this section: What about the employee’s work ethic do you appreciate? Why do you value your talents? These questions will help you explain to your future employee why they will be an asset to the company and how you will reward them for their hard work and dedication."

 

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exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Supporting Your Employees Edition

Last week we talked about the oft-overlooked yet major necessity in startup and high-growth companies: employee feedback. This week, we're taking that a step further. Feedback is just the baseline requirement with your employees. You also owe them some support, coaching and development along the way.  That's not to say they shouldn't take ownership of their own careers and development. They should. But you need to show them how.  Supporting your employees is part of your job even if your company is three people. This week we've rounded up some advice for you as managers and some links to pass along to your team. Feedback is the beginning, follow-through, learning, growth and development is another.

For your team:

1) Four Ways to Advance Your Career at a Startup at The Daily Muse

"At a start-up, there’s always way more to do than people to get it done. So, think about the types of people your company would hire if the company was twice the size, choose an area that you’d like to learn about, and suggest a project to the founders. For example, if your company has talked about building out a sales team in the future and you’d love to get exposure in that area, offer to test out the viability of sales as a customer acquisition strategy. As long as you’re still performing in your core role, your manager will probably be happy to have the extra help—and you’ll have the chance to build out a new skill set."

2) Why Your Boss Still Hasn't Promoted You at The Fast Track

"Do you take feedback well, or get huffy and pout or gripe about any criticism? You’ve got to develop thicker skin the higher you go on the career ladder, so an inability to accept feedback professionally could be sending the message you’re immature and not ready to play with the big kids."

For you:

3) Managing with Empathy at Medium

"As you might imagine, the work days at Obama for America (the president’s 2012 reëlection campaign) were long, with good reason. But it takes its toll on people over time. My colleague Lauren Peterson came up with the idea of guaranteeing folks two nights each week that, no matter what, they’d be out the door by 8 p.m. We quickly adopted this on my team and referred to it as “time to do human things”. A few people asked me if they could come in at noon instead. That let them pay bills, buy groceries or just get some much needed sleep. The “in by noon” option quickly became the more popular choice."

4) How to Write a Love Letter to Your Future Startup Employee at Tech Cocktail

"... explain how you will show employees how your startup values their talent, work ethic, and dedication. Consider the following questions for inspiration writing this section: What about the employee’s work ethic do you appreciate? Why do you value your talents? These questions will help you explain to your future employee why they will be an asset to the company and how you will reward them for their hard work and dedication."

 

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exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Talent and HR News Roundup: Supporting Your Employees Edition

Last week we talked about the oft-overlooked yet major necessity in startup and high-growth companies: employee feedback. This week, we're taking that a step further. Feedback is just the baseline requirement with your employees. You also owe them some support, coaching and development along the way.  That's not to say they shouldn't take ownership of their own careers and development. They should. But you need to show them how.  Supporting your employees is part of your job even if your company is three people. This week we've rounded up some advice for you as managers and some links to pass along to your team. Feedback is the beginning, follow-through, learning, growth and development is another.

For your team:

1) Four Ways to Advance Your Career at a Startup at The Daily Muse

"At a start-up, there’s always way more to do than people to get it done. So, think about the types of people your company would hire if the company was twice the size, choose an area that you’d like to learn about, and suggest a project to the founders. For example, if your company has talked about building out a sales team in the future and you’d love to get exposure in that area, offer to test out the viability of sales as a customer acquisition strategy. As long as you’re still performing in your core role, your manager will probably be happy to have the extra help—and you’ll have the chance to build out a new skill set."

2) Why Your Boss Still Hasn't Promoted You at The Fast Track

"Do you take feedback well, or get huffy and pout or gripe about any criticism? You’ve got to develop thicker skin the higher you go on the career ladder, so an inability to accept feedback professionally could be sending the message you’re immature and not ready to play with the big kids."

For you:

3) Managing with Empathy at Medium

"As you might imagine, the work days at Obama for America (the president’s 2012 reëlection campaign) were long, with good reason. But it takes its toll on people over time. My colleague Lauren Peterson came up with the idea of guaranteeing folks two nights each week that, no matter what, they’d be out the door by 8 p.m. We quickly adopted this on my team and referred to it as “time to do human things”. A few people asked me if they could come in at noon instead. That let them pay bills, buy groceries or just get some much needed sleep. The “in by noon” option quickly became the more popular choice."

4) How to Write a Love Letter to Your Future Startup Employee at Tech Cocktail

"... explain how you will show employees how your startup values their talent, work ethic, and dedication. Consider the following questions for inspiration writing this section: What about the employee’s work ethic do you appreciate? Why do you value your talents? These questions will help you explain to your future employee why they will be an asset to the company and how you will reward them for their hard work and dedication."

 

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exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Employee Recognition: Required for Company Growth

Ever move so fast as a part of a startup or high-growth company that you forget to look up? Yep, us too. But when you forget to look up, or you're moving full-steam ahead, it's easy to ignore one of the things that matters most: your people. Thank you

Leaders are often the worst culprits. They've got so much invested in success they're laser-focused on the finish line instead of who's in the pit changing the tires at warp speed. It's not a fault per se. At startups, employees don't often expect grand recognition -- they're used to moving so fast, their value often comes from the end result: shipping code, launching product or landing a great, new customer or client.  And at high-growth companies, as numbers rise, so does anonymity. But in reality, it matters. Typically only about half of all employees say they receive recognition for doing good work. Do you? And more importantly, are you a giver?

Here's a leadership test--are you good at recognition? 

1) Is thank you in your vocabulary?

Do an email search of your inbox for the words "thank you" and look for patterns. Are you only thanking clients or partners? When was the last time you sent an email with that subject line, or only for the purpose of thanking an employee? Sure, you may assume your employees know you appreciate them. But they need to hear it from you.

2) Have you ever bought a gift for someone on your team?

Every once in awhile, when someone goes out of their way for you, it's worth tangible recognition. It doesn't have to be a Ferrari, but the fact that you took the time to buy something to thank someone is a big deal. Maybe they covered for you while you were on vacation. Or took on an extra project or solved a client problem in the wee hours of the morning. Whatever it is, thank them with something specific that's catered to them. An Amazon gift card is nice, but if you know I love yoga, why not a gift certificate for a free class or two? If you don't know, it's time to get to know your employees.

3) Do you know who is your company is valued by your peers?

Managers are often dead wrong about employee performance. They're either not paying enough attention, documenting performance or have an accurate understanding of how a project really got done. Peer recognition can be a great way to supplement regular feedback so giving peers a public forum to recognize each other not only adds value to the employee but gives leaders insight into where the real talent value is.

4) Do you have a platform to track recognition?

Do you have a formal platform?  An employee recognition platform on steroids, YouEarnedIt allows employees to reward each other points providing public recognition and personal redemption based on a company's redemption options. Companies can decide what goes in the rewards catalog--anything from Apple gift cards to KitchenAid mixers to charitable donations. Company leaders then have insight into who's doing good. A similar tool called Bonus.ly offers a cash option too.  You also can consider tracking recognition and how happy employees are through a tool like TinyPulse, perfect for startups and high-growth companies.

How'd you do? If you answered no almost all of these, it's time to get moving.

Recognition is a fine line--you don't want to do it all the time, every minute of every day. But you do need to make it a regular habit--especially if you're moving fast. Those workers who are changing tires in 30 seconds? They're probably working harder that you and really deserve a thank you.

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exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Employee Recognition: Required for Company Growth

Ever move so fast as a part of a startup or high-growth company that you forget to look up? Yep, us too. But when you forget to look up, or you're moving full-steam ahead, it's easy to ignore one of the things that matters most: your people. Thank you

Leaders are often the worst culprits. They've got so much invested in success they're laser-focused on the finish line instead of who's in the pit changing the tires at warp speed. It's not a fault per se. At startups, employees don't often expect grand recognition -- they're used to moving so fast, their value often comes from the end result: shipping code, launching product or landing a great, new customer or client.  And at high-growth companies, as numbers rise, so does anonymity. But in reality, it matters. Typically only about half of all employees say they receive recognition for doing good work. Do you? And more importantly, are you a giver?

Here's a leadership test--are you good at recognition? 

1) Is thank you in your vocabulary?

Do an email search of your inbox for the words "thank you" and look for patterns. Are you only thanking clients or partners? When was the last time you sent an email with that subject line, or only for the purpose of thanking an employee? Sure, you may assume your employees know you appreciate them. But they need to hear it from you.

2) Have you ever bought a gift for someone on your team?

Every once in awhile, when someone goes out of their way for you, it's worth tangible recognition. It doesn't have to be a Ferrari, but the fact that you took the time to buy something to thank someone is a big deal. Maybe they covered for you while you were on vacation. Or took on an extra project or solved a client problem in the wee hours of the morning. Whatever it is, thank them with something specific that's catered to them. An Amazon gift card is nice, but if you know I love yoga, why not a gift certificate for a free class or two? If you don't know, it's time to get to know your employees.

3) Do you know who is your company is valued by your peers?

Managers are often dead wrong about employee performance. They're either not paying enough attention, documenting performance or have an accurate understanding of how a project really got done. Peer recognition can be a great way to supplement regular feedback so giving peers a public forum to recognize each other not only adds value to the employee but gives leaders insight into where the real talent value is.

4) Do you have a platform to track recognition?

Do you have a formal platform?  An employee recognition platform on steroids, YouEarnedIt allows employees to reward each other points providing public recognition and personal redemption based on a company's redemption options. Companies can decide what goes in the rewards catalog--anything from Apple gift cards to KitchenAid mixers to charitable donations. Company leaders then have insight into who's doing good. A similar tool called Bonus.ly offers a cash option too.  You also can consider tracking recognition and how happy employees are through a tool like TinyPulse, perfect for startups and high-growth companies.

How'd you do? If you answered no almost all of these, it's time to get moving.

Recognition is a fine line--you don't want to do it all the time, every minute of every day. But you do need to make it a regular habit--especially if you're moving fast. Those workers who are changing tires in 30 seconds? They're probably working harder that you and really deserve a thank you.

----

exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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Employee Recognition: Required for Company Growth

Ever move so fast as a part of a startup or high-growth company that you forget to look up? Yep, us too. But when you forget to look up, or you're moving full-steam ahead, it's easy to ignore one of the things that matters most: your people. Thank you

Leaders are often the worst culprits. They've got so much invested in success they're laser-focused on the finish line instead of who's in the pit changing the tires at warp speed. It's not a fault per se. At startups, employees don't often expect grand recognition -- they're used to moving so fast, their value often comes from the end result: shipping code, launching product or landing a great, new customer or client.  And at high-growth companies, as numbers rise, so does anonymity. But in reality, it matters. Typically only about half of all employees say they receive recognition for doing good work. Do you? And more importantly, are you a giver?

Here's a leadership test--are you good at recognition? 

1) Is thank you in your vocabulary?

Do an email search of your inbox for the words "thank you" and look for patterns. Are you only thanking clients or partners? When was the last time you sent an email with that subject line, or only for the purpose of thanking an employee? Sure, you may assume your employees know you appreciate them. But they need to hear it from you.

2) Have you ever bought a gift for someone on your team?

Every once in awhile, when someone goes out of their way for you, it's worth tangible recognition. It doesn't have to be a Ferrari, but the fact that you took the time to buy something to thank someone is a big deal. Maybe they covered for you while you were on vacation. Or took on an extra project or solved a client problem in the wee hours of the morning. Whatever it is, thank them with something specific that's catered to them. An Amazon gift card is nice, but if you know I love yoga, why not a gift certificate for a free class or two? If you don't know, it's time to get to know your employees.

3) Do you know who is your company is valued by your peers?

Managers are often dead wrong about employee performance. They're either not paying enough attention, documenting performance or have an accurate understanding of how a project really got done. Peer recognition can be a great way to supplement regular feedback so giving peers a public forum to recognize each other not only adds value to the employee but gives leaders insight into where the real talent value is.

4) Do you have a platform to track recognition?

Do you have a formal platform?  An employee recognition platform on steroids, YouEarnedIt allows employees to reward each other points providing public recognition and personal redemption based on a company's redemption options. Companies can decide what goes in the rewards catalog--anything from Apple gift cards to KitchenAid mixers to charitable donations. Company leaders then have insight into who's doing good. A similar tool called Bonus.ly offers a cash option too.  You also can consider tracking recognition and how happy employees are through a tool like TinyPulse, perfect for startups and high-growth companies.

How'd you do? If you answered no almost all of these, it's time to get moving.

Recognition is a fine line--you don't want to do it all the time, every minute of every day. But you do need to make it a regular habit--especially if you're moving fast. Those workers who are changing tires in 30 seconds? They're probably working harder that you and really deserve a thank you.

----

exaqueo is a human resources consultancy that helps startups and high-growth companies build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you build a workforce that’s aligned with your company culture and develop an employer brand that will allow your business to grow in the right way.

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