Lately in HR and Talent news it seems everyone has some sort of advice to give, whether it's around technology, creating culture, or motivating employees. We've compiled a bunch of these words of wisdom that have been in the news recently for your reading pleasure. Enjoy!

1) Six New Year's Resolutions for Employers from Huffington Post

"I'm not very good at New Year's resolutions. It's never made sense to me to pick an arbitrary date and pretend I'm going to start doing something -- or everything -- differently from that point on. Any gym owner can tell you how the weight room and spin classes swell each January, only to return to near-empty by March. Resolutions rarely effect any permanent change. Nonetheless, a little wishful thinking never hurt anyone. So this year I've written some resolutions. The twist is, they're not for me. They're for employers. Specifically, they're for all those employers out there who haven't yet figured out that work doesn't always have to be drudgery, that turnover doesn't always have to be sky-high, and that it's not only possible for a more humane work environment to co-exist with profits, it's probable."

2) SHRM Panel Unveils 2016 Trends in Technology from SHRM

"Better-educating employees, achieving technology compliance, developing talent insights and improving social media communications are among the 10 technology trends HR will grapple with in 2016, according to the Society for Human Resource Management’s (SHRM’s) Technology and HR Management Special Expertise Panel. The trends will be part of SHRM’s upcoming Future Insights research report. Comprised of HR practitioners, software vendors, and HR technology professionals with small and global organizations, the group spent nearly a year devising the list."

3) The Best Way to Build Company Culture from Fortune

"Don’t be careful what you wish for. In the recent $12.2 billion merger between Marriott International and Starwood Hotels, Marriott CEO Arne Sorenson sent a letter to all 180,000 Starwood associates that centered not on the business benefits of the merger, but on the cultural implications. “A big part of our people-first culture is treating people with respect and transparency,” wrote Sorenson, whose company has been on Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For list 18 times. “You’ll experience both as we work through this process.” When the Internet emerged in the mid-1990s, many saw it as a fad, promoted by young techies who had no idea how to run a business. Now we know that businesses that didn’t embrace the Internet early on had to catch up later."

4) To Motivate Employees, Do 3 Things Well from Harvard Business Review

"Given the extraordinary low levels of engagement in the U.S. workforce — a recent Gallup poll showed that 70% of employees are “not engaged” or “actively disengaged” at work — many leaders are looking for solutions. Some turn to material perks (bonuses, game rooms, free food) in the hopes of making employees happier. However, research suggests that these efforts, while appreciated, do not address more effective drivers of long-term well-being. Instead, leaders should be mindful about giving their employees three things."

5) Why You Should Give 'Overqualified' Job Candidates a Second Look from Fortune

"The stereotypes about them are untrue, says a new study. Of all the reasons why applicants’ resumes get tossed in the circular file, “the O word”, for overqualified, has long been in the Top Ten. After all, everyone knows that a person with loftier credentials or more experience than his or her peers will be a less committed, less productive employee who’ll quit as soon as a better offer comes along. Now it turns out that everyone is probably wrong. A study recently published in the Journal of Applied Psychology looked closely at dozens of “overqualified” hires in 11 information and technology companies."

Lexi Gordon is a Lead Consultant for exaqueo, a workforce consultancy that helps organizations build their cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact exaqueo to learn more about our employer brand innovation, workforce research, and recruiting strategy offerings.

 

 

 

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