Dear HR, Recruiters and Hiring Managers:

Every year when Veterans Day rolls around, we love to get a piece of the action. We dutifully thank our veterans, offer them discounts on products and services and create wistful, tear-inducing commercials talking about our commitment. Social media is not exception. From hashtags to heartfelt posts, we'll be uber-thanking our veterans and those serving in the military. As we should.

But it's not really what veterans want. Ask them.

They appreciate the thanks, the offers, the discounts. But what they really want is action. Someone to help them in a way they really need. 

This Veterans Day, sure, thank your veterans on your careers Facebook pages and career sites. But do more.  The military has a bias to action. Where do you think "get sh*t done" really comes from?  So, take some action.

Stop and look at the resume that's hard to read. The one with all the strange acronyms and titles. The one where it says in small print: "commanded a unit of over 400 soldiers." Or the one that references "nuclear incidents" or a "War on Terrorism Service Medal."

Many recruiters shy away from military resumes because they can't understand them.

It's easy to pass on a resume in your ATS. Especially ones that are poorly formatted or aren't an obvious fit for the job. In many cases, that's completely understandable. But this Veterans Day, if you really want to do something for a Vet, give him or her a chance. Better yet, reach out and offer to help make their resume even better.

If you've never hired a vet, or aren't familiar with military experience, here are a few resources to consider. No go do something.

 

Susan LaMotte is the founder of exaqueo, a workforce consultancy that helps companies build cultures, employer brands and talent strategies. Contact exaqueo to learn how to better compete for talent by building honest, authentic employer brands and powerful talent attraction and retention programs.

 

 

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